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ready mix driver

There aren’t many drivers who can boast that they’re helping to literally build their community from the ground up. Ready Mix Drivers are the exception. We were able to talk to Marcus, a ready mix driver with PAHL Ready Mix Concrete to learn what the job’s like as well as some important factors around it, like pay and home time.  

What is a Ready Mix Driver?

Marcus, Driver with PAHL Ready Mix Concrete

“The main job of a ready mix driver is to deliver concrete to a job site. That job site could be for a residential home or a commercial building depending on the carrier you work for and the clients they serve. Ready mix drivers work in a wide range of employment situations.

They may work for a concrete contractor, as an independent contractor, or as part of a concrete delivery service. In most cases, drivers will be responsible for loading and unloading, so this is a labor-intensive job, but don’t let that scare you away.” 

Job Requirements

To get started as a ready mix driver, you will need two things; a CDL and driving experience. Depending on the job, ready mix drivers must have either a CDL A or B. In addition, employers who are hiring for this line of work typically look for drivers who have experience in similar jobs such as tanker and liquid hauling.

Experience with automotive maintenance is also a plus because ready mix trucks require more cleaning than many other types of trucks.  

Those are the resume requirements for being a ready mix driver, but to be successful in the position, drivers should check off a few extra boxes as well. Given the amount of labor required for loading and unloading, a high level of physical fitness is a must.

Similarly, a strong work ethic is extremely important for ready mix drivers. Employers want drivers they can rely on who know how to overcome obstacles and will work hard to get the job done.  

Pros

Pay & Routine

Ready mix jobs typically pay well. This is particularly true considering that many positions are local and only ask for a CDL B. Many (but not all) ready mix jobs are paid hourly. If you’re looking to bring in some extra pay, being a ready mix driver in the heavy season is a great way to do it.  

Ready mix jobs offer a great mix between job consistency and new people and places to meet. Marcus shared his perspective on his typical routine, 

PAHL Ready Mix Truck

Marcus’s Ready Mix Truck

“Mixer drivers get to see everything from start to finish of projects big and small. There’s also a lot of variety in the job as ready mix drivers haul concrete to many different job locations and contractors daily.” 

Home Time

The majority of ready mix driving jobs are local, meaning that drivers will be home every night. This makes ready mix driving a great option for drivers who are unable to be on the road for days or weeks at a time. 

Customer Interaction

If you’re a social driver, a ready mix job might be a great fit for you. Depending on your customers and routes, you may have a high level of customer interaction. As a result, strong customer service skills are a huge plus. Ready mix drivers will often return regularly to the same construction site, so drivers who can build lasting relationships with customers are extremely valuable. 

Cons

Job Seasonality & Weather Concerns

The nature of concrete work means that ready mix jobs are highly seasonal. Depending on where you live and the weather conditions there, the length of the season can vary by a few weeks or a few months.  

In addition, ready mix drivers need to be prepared to work outdoors in a range of weather conditions. As Marcus puts it, 

“Ready mix drivers are ready to work in any kind of weather that’s thrown at them to accomplish the end result.” 

Schedule

If you like to sleep in, ready mix driving might not be for you. Most days will start early in the morning, as 6:00 AM start times are not uncommon. Most drivers can get used to this routine pretty quickly, but if mornings aren’t your thing, ready mix work will be a challenge. 

Job Physicality

A lot of manual labor is required, so ready mix drivers should make it a point to be in good shape. In addition to loading and unloading, ready mix drivers are responsible for cleaning and maintenance. Because concrete can harden in the mixing tank, drivers must carefully clean it out at the end of every shift. On a good day, this might be primarily hose work, but tough concrete pieces may require drivers to chip away at them manually until they come off. 

Finding Ready Mix Jobs

One of the best places to look for ready mix jobs is in your community. The majority of these jobs are local, so drive around town or a call up to some ready mix companies in your area to see if they’re hiring. 

To find a ready mix job that is a great fit for your qualifications and personal lifestyle preferences, you can also check out Drive My Way. We match qualified drivers with companies that fit each driver’s specific qualifications and lifestyle needs. 

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Wreaths Across America

While we have Veterans Day to honor the living, and Memorial Day to remember the fallen, our service members shouldn’t only be thought about twice a year. They sacrifice their comfort to ensure our freedom every day of the year, including during the holidays.  

That’s why Wreaths Across America was founded. The organization makes it their mission to honor the service members who are across seas and remember those who are no longer with us by laying wreaths at their headstones during the holiday season.  

Here’s what truck drivers should know about the time-honored tradition, including its history, and how they can get involved.  

What is Wreaths Across America?

Wreaths Across America describes their overall mission in three simple words, “Remember, Honor, and Teach.” Remember our fallen U.S Veterans, honor those who have served, and teach your children the value of freedom.”  

Each year, a day in December is set aside as Wreaths Across America day. This day is usually the second- or third-day Saturday of the month. On that day, the organization coordinates wreath-laying ceremonies at thousands of U.S cemeteries across all fifty states, including Arlington National Cemetery. 

What’s the History of Wreaths Across America?

Wreaths Across AmericaIn 1992, after finding his company had a surplus of wreaths after the holiday season, Morrill Worcester, owner of the Worcester Wreath Company made a large donation of 5,000 wreaths to Arlington National Cemetery. Worcester continued making donations like this for the next 15 years, and it eventually caught on to the point that thousands of other people wanted to join in on the good cause.  

In 2007, Worcester officially founded Wreaths Across America, and the organization has been donating thousands of wreaths every year since. 

How can Truck Drivers Get Involved with Wreaths Across America?

  While everybody can get involved with Wreaths Across America by donating a wreath, truck drivers are unique in their ability to help even more. Through their carrier, truck drivers can volunteer as drivers for Wreaths Across America, transporting wreaths to locations where their events are held.  

Drive My Way client, NFI is one of the carriers that has truck drivers who volunteer for Wreaths Across America during the holiday season.  

NFI driver and National Guardsman, Jason is one of these drivers. Here’s what he had to say about his involvement with the organization, 

“I like that NFI really appreciates their drivers, just as much as the National Guard appreciated what I did for them. Like in the military, without your lower enlisted, you don’t have a service. Here at NFI, if you don’t have drivers, you’re not going to have a company.” 

Drivers who are interested in volunteering for Wreaths Across America should reach out to their carrier to see if they’re able to donate their time for the cause.  

And while not all truck drivers may be able to drive for Wreaths Across America, that doesn’t mean they can’t still be involved. Truck drivers can always choose to sponsor one wreath or multiple wreaths.

They can dedicate their wreath to honoring a veteran who’s still with us, in memory of a fallen hero, or choose to not dedicate their wreath, and instead remember all who have served.  

The organization also has an online shop where you can purchase clothes, branded items, and wreaths that you can hang on your own door.  

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If you’re a truck driver looking for a new haul, you may (or may not have) considered hauling livestock. There’s a lot of notions out there about what working with livestock is and isn’t. That’s why we talked to a livestock hauler who told us what the job is really like and gave some tips for people considering this line of work. So, if you’re curious about hauling livestock, here are 3 things to know.

1. Types of Livestock Drivers Haul

When many people think of hauling livestock, there’s a good chance that they think of cows or pigs. While those animals do make up the largest part of the livestock transportation industry, livestock haulers can carry anything that is live freight. This can mean chickens, goats, sheep, and even bees. There are even some livestock haulers who carry high-value livestock such as show horses.  

Patience and attention to detail while loading and unloading the animals are two huge traits that good livestock haulers must have. As anyone who works with animals knows, getting frustrated with them rarely makes things go faster. It will only stress the livestock and in turn, make you more stressed.  

Livestock drivers also need to be patient behind the wheel and drive defensively. Harsh stops or turns can easily stress or injure livestock. Regulations for carrying livestock vary somewhat by state, so drivers must be detail-oriented to ensure compliance for every load. 

2. A Whole New World of “Touch Freight” and Cleanup

For livestock hauling, sanitation is incredibly important. Livestock haulers must maintain sanitary practices when moving between locations or loading and unloading livestock so they don’t transmit infection. This might seem like too much hassle for some drivers, but for livestock haulers, it’s all part of a day’s work. 

We talked to Dustin, a cattle hauler and co-owner of Nesbitt Transportation, and asked him if he had any advice for drivers considering hauling livestock. He shared this, 

Dustin Nesbitt hauling livestock

Dustin, livestock hauler for Nesbitt Transportation

“Someone who is going into hauling cattle needs to be patient. It’s not like driving freight. You need to give yourself extra time around other vehicles because it takes longer to stop with a live load.

You also need to be patient with the animals and have your head on a swivel—always protect yourself. Cattle’s attitudes can change in a split second and go from cooperating to wanting to kill you, so always keep your eyes on the animals when loading and unloading.”

Agfax adds several additional tips for transporting cattle. According to their website, a thorough pre-trip inspection is even more important for livestock haulers. Delays for maintenance or repairs can cause extra stress on the animals, especially if there are heat or chill concerns.  

They also recommend that drivers master livestock sorting. Within any type of livestock haul, drivers should transport similar animals together. For example, large cows should be transported with other large cows, not with calves or cows that are small or weak. If you do have to transport different animals together, it’s best to use a gate to separate them.  

3. Livestock Truck Drivers Earn More

hauling livestockWhile livestock haulers often have to meet specific requirements beyond a typical CDL driver, they are also well compensated for their work. Livestock haulers are considered specialty haulers, so their pay is increased. That said, these drivers earn higher pay for good reason. 

Livestock haulers must maintain additional certifications that show their understanding of the risks of hauling live animals. In addition, owner operators will need to purchase specific equipment. The type of trailer that drivers need depends on the type of animals and the distance of the haul. No matter the exact specialty, that equipment is not cheap. 

Livestock hauling is a specialty niche for people with a lot of patience who don’t mind the good, the bad, and the smelly of working with live animals. This makes it a good fit if you’re a truck driver who has experience working on a farm or ranch or you’re simply looking for a new challenge in trucking. 

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cdl driving test

If you’ve recently passed the CDL driving test, you know the relief, pride, and satisfaction that comes along with it. Truck driving can be a great career, and if you’re thinking about becoming a driver, passing the CDL driving test is your first step. Here’s what you need to know to pass the CDL test with flying colors.  

What Does the CDL Test Consist of?

It’s different in every state, but all tests will consist of a written knowledge test and a driving test. In some states, the written test is taken to get your CDL permit, while in others it’s taken to get your actual CDL. The driving test goes by different names state to state, but will always consist of some combination of these; pre-trip inspection, basic skills (or backing), and road skills.  

1. Study, Study, Study

Like with any test, the best way to pass the CDL test is to study.  

Every state has some sort of guide or study material for their CDL test. There are a lot of websites that may ask you to pay for a study guide, but you can usually find a free version on the state’s D/BMV website.  

Once you’ve got your study materials, you’ll need to set a study schedule for yourself. Choose a target date to take the test and then spend a little time studying every day, preferably the same time every day so you can get used to the routine of it.  

Also, be realistic about the date you choose. You’ll want to be fresh for the test and stay motivated, so choose something relatively close. That said, make sure you give yourself enough time to properly study. For most people, 2-3 weeks is a good timeframe.  

Once you get to know the material, start taking practice tests. Many states offer free practice tests on their website. There are also third-party sites like Trucker Country that allow practice tests. Drivers can take a generalized test for a CDL license or practice tests that are for a specific endorsement. These practice tests are a great way to test your knowledge and find any areas that need more studying.  

But, just be aware that the CDL test is a little different based on what state you are in. Make sure you get a copy of the study guide from the state where you’ll be taking the licensing test.

2. Demonstrate Technical Expertise

With the written portion of the CDL test done, it’s time to show off your driving skills. First and foremost, make sure you know the truck. The last thing you want is to try and make a simple air vent adjustment and be fumbling with the buttons. With the evaluator watching, even routine adjustments can feel like they have a lot of pressure. Know the inside of the cab like the back of your hand.  

Aside from knowing the inside of your cab, there are a few skills that you absolutely have to get right to pass the CDL driving test. Some of them are obvious — don’t stall and no shifting at intersections. Others are skills that you may need to be more conscious about.  

For example, it’s very important to use proper exit and entry techniques when you are getting in and out of the truck. Similarly, train yourself to notice weight limit signs as you’re driving.  

An examiner may ask you about a posted weight limit sign shortly after you’ve passed it. You need to know what it said. Any time you are driving, even in a personal vehicle, try to notice details on the road like weight limit signs.  

We spoke with new CDL driver Brittany, and she shared this advice:  

New CDL Driver, Brittany

New CDL Driver, Brittany

“If you’re going to school, be out there every day doing pre-trip inspections and maneuvers and stay focused while doing it. Ask all the questions you can think of because that’s what instructors are for. No question is a dumb question and don’t be nervous on test day. All the practice will show as long as you’ve put in the work.”

3. Make the Basics Obvious

trucking carrierWhen you take the CDL driving test, it’s easy to focus on the things that will be challenging, but don’t forget the basics. These are the things that are probably almost second nature to you, and you do them any time you drive.  

Keep two hands on the wheel. Check your mirrors and scan regularly. Signal all lane changes. Keep an eye out for speed limit signs and make sure you’re driving a few miles per hour under the speed limit. All of these are common sense basics, but make a point to make these obvious when you take your licensing test. 

4. Beyond Passing

DOT inspectionMake sure you know the automatic failure points so you can avoid them, but set your sights higher. Don’t focus on just barely passing. When you are in the cab with the evaluator, remember to stick to your purpose. You’re not in the cab to make friends, so don’t get too chatty. Some evaluators may consider this distracted driving.  

Above all, stay calm even if you make mistakes. You will likely encounter at least one small unexpected surprise while doing the CDL driving test. Take in the new information and keep moving forward. If you made a mistake, fix it for the next time.  

A calm personality and the ability to respond well to unexpected changes are key for drivers. Demonstrating that skill in a road test will impress your evaluator and give them confidence in your ability to be on the road professionally. 

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types of truck drivers

 

The saying “everything gets moved on a truck” isn’t much of an exaggeration. Dry goods, farm animals, propane, ready-mix concrete, and just about anything else you can think of gets loaded onto a truck trailer at one point or another.  

Over time, people have figured out the best way to haul these different kinds of freight, and there are now specializations for each one. Each of these specializations have different CDL requirements and afford different home time for the driver. Here are the 13 main types of truck driver hauls along with the CDL needed for each one. 

The 3 Types of CDL

types of truck drivers

 

Before you get any type of trucking job, you’ll first need a CDL. Here are the three classes of CDL and what you can drive with each.  

CDL A

This is your standard CDL that lets you drive a semi-truck with a trailer in tow. Here’s the official definition from the FMCSA of what CDL A holders can drive, 

“Any combination of vehicles which has a gross combination weight rating or gross combination weight of 11,794 kilograms or more (26,001 pounds or more) whichever is greater, inclusive of a towed unit(s) with a gross vehicle weight rating or gross vehicle weight of more than 4,536 kilograms (10,000 pounds) whichever is greater. “

This means that anyone with a CDL A can drive a truck with a GVWR greater than 26,000 pounds and a trailer weighing more than 10,000 pounds. CDL A drivers can drive any CMV, including class B and C vehicles, provided they have the appropriate endorsements.  

CDL B

A Class B CDL is a restricted license as you are not allowed to drive large tractors that tow 10,000 pounds or more. This eliminates the ability to drive your standard 53’ trailer. So, what can you drive with a CDL B? Think of dump trucks, delivery trucks, and city buses. Two huge benefits to CDL B jobs are that most positions will be local, and the age requirement is 18 since you won’t be moving freight between state lines.  

CDL C

A Class C is the most unique type of CDL and for good reason. Besides being able to drive a shuttle bus or limo, there’s very little someone can do with a CDL C without the necessary endorsements. Even with those endorsements, most drivers consider it better to just go ahead and get your CDL B or A instead.   

The 3 Types of Runs

 

OTR, local, and regional are the three main types of trucking runs you’ll encounter as a driver. Here are the differences between each one.  

OTR

OTR stands for “Over the Road”. OTR drivers go all across the country and are usually out for a few weeks at a time. This type of trucking is for someone who really loves the trucker life and doesn’t mind being away from home for long periods of time. Because of the nature of this work, OTR drivers, especially the more experienced ones, tend to make more than regional or local drivers. 

Local

As the name suggests, local drivers stay close to home and are usually off on the weekends. A few tradeoffs are that local drivers on average make less than regional or OTR drivers, and the work may be more physically demanding (think delivery and final mile jobs). But if you’re a driver with a family and are looking for steady pay and a set schedule, local jobs are hard to beat.  

Regional

Regional trucking is the midway point between OTR and local. Regional drivers will run routes across a specified region, usually a few states covering 1,000 miles. This means that regional drivers are home every few days. Just like with local jobs, there’s also a level of predictability with regional work, since you’ll likely have a set route you run.  

13 Types of Trucking Hauls

 

Auto Hauling  

Auto haulers are some of the most recognizable trucks on the road. As you could guess, auto haulers are responsible for transporting new and remarketed vehicles from manufacturing plants, ports, railheads and auctions to retail dealerships and auction sites. These jobs can be local, regional, or OTR and require a CDL A.  

Building Products  

Building products hauling is often a local position where drivers deliver roofing and other building products to customer’s homes and job sites.  

This type of work is for drivers who don’t mind splitting time between driving and doing manual labor like unloading and loading building products and working in the warehouse. The good news is that these positions are usually local and only require a CDL B.

Concert Trucking  

Concert truckers haul stage and lighting equipment, instruments, and anything else needed for concerts and shows. Drivers will go on tour with bands or acts for a few months at a time to support an entire tour or a leg of it.  

Concert trucking jobs pay very well, and you build a level of camaraderie with other drivers you’re on tour with, but they’re definitely not for someone who needs a lot of home time. 

Dry Van  

Dry Van trucking is what you think about when you hear “semi-truck”. Dry van truckers haul a 53’ trailer filled with pallets or loose cargo. “Dry Van” can also mean a straight truck or PUP trailers, though that’s not what we usually think of with Dry Van. These jobs are usually OTR or Regional and require a CDL A. 

Final Mile  

Final mile is any time that all-important last step of the logistics chain is completed, when the product goes from the warehouse to the customer’s front door. Final mile drivers can drive anything from a straight truck down to a sprinter van. This means that to drive for some carriers, you won’t even need a CDL, and at most will need a CDL B.   

The biggest benefits to final mile driving are the home time and consistent shifts, since these positions are typically local. The downside is that final mile driving is fast-paced, with a lot being expected of these drivers. 

Flatbed  

Flatbed drivers are some of the most in-demand drivers in the trucking industry today. Why? Flatbed driving is a highly skilled position that not every trucker can do. Many times, these drivers carry oversized loads and need to know how to secure them properly and how to drive very carefully to avoid mishaps or accidents.  

Because of this, flatbed jobs tend to pay better than most CDL jobs. These positions are typically reserved for CDL A drivers but can be local, regional, or OTR.  

Hazmat  

Hazmat drivers haul any type of hazardous materials from one place to another. A hazardous material is anything that could harm a person, animal, or the environment when it mixes with other things like air, fire, water, or other chemicals.  

Because of this, these drivers need to have a special endorsement before they can start hauling hazmat. Like flatbed driving, hazmat jobs are in-demand right now, so it’s a great time to get your endorsement. These jobs can be local, regional, or OTR and typically require a CDL A.  

Livestock  

Livestock hauling is defined as hauling any freight that’s alive. While we usually think of cows, pigs, and chickens, livestock hauling encompasses everything from horses to bees.  

With livestock hauling positions, there’s more to it than just the driving. Drivers must completely sanitize trailers after every load, or they could infect the livestock in their next load. All this extra work does pay off though. Livestock hauling is considered a specialty position, so drivers are well compensated for their work. Livestock hauling can be local, regional, or OTR and typically requires a CDL A.  

Ready Mix  

Ready mix drivers work with concrete and spend most of their days outside. The main job of a ready mix driver is to deliver concrete or cement to a job site. In most cases, drivers will be responsible for loading and unloading, so this is a labor-intensive job, but don’t let that scare you away. 

Ready mix jobs typically pay well. This is particularly true considering that many positions are local and only ask for a CDL B license. One drawback is that this line of work is highly seasonal and dependent on weather. 

Reefer  

Refrigerated (or reefer) drivers haul a specialized trailer that keeps cargo at a certain temperature, like frozen food, produce, and medicine. Reefer jobs can be CDL B, but typically require a CDL A. They can also be local, regional, or OTR.  

Tanker  

Tanker drivers haul gasses or liquids. These positions are seen as more dangerous and skilled than your average CDL position, so the pay reflects that. If you’re driving a tanker, there’s a good chance you’ll be hauling hazmat, so it’s a good idea to get your necessary endorsements before looking into this kind of work.  

Tanker drivers are needed for all sorts of runs, so as long as you have your CDL A and the necessary endorsements and experience, you’ll be able to find local, regional, and OTR work as a tanker driver.

Team Driving  

Team driving is when two drivers share a cab and driving duties. Some special types of hauling require team drivers, usually when cargo is time sensitive or very valuable. But team drivers are more common with owner operators. Many times, a husband-and-wife team will be partners on the road, each taking a share of the driving.  

The biggest advantage of team driving is that you’re able to cover much more ground than you would as a solo driver, since team drivers can switch off between driving and sleeping. Just make sure you get along with your co-pilot, otherwise team driving can be more of a headache than it’s worth. Most team driving positions will be for CDL A drivers running OTR or regional.  

Waste Management  

Waste Management truck driver jobs can be a great fit for new and experienced drivers alike. They’re also good for drivers who like to stay on the move throughout the day. One thing to keep in mind is that these jobs require a lot of physical labor. Waste management jobs are typically local and only require a CDL B. 

Interested in any of these positions? Drive My Way has hundreds of open CDL positions with industry leading carriers in many of these categories. Make a free, secure profile below and find your next CDL job.  

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concert trucking

What is Concert Trucking?

Concert trucking is a specialization in the trucking industry. It’s an OTR position where drivers haul stage and lighting equipment, instruments, and anything else needed for concerts and shows. Drivers will go on tour with bands or acts for a few months at a time to support an entire tour or a leg of it. Most tours will need a full team of drivers to work it, so as a concert trucker, you’ll be spending a lot of time with your fellow drivers.

We were able to speak with Cid, a CDL A Driver with Drive My Way client, Upstaging. Cid has been with the company since January of 2021. He shared what his day-to-day looks like, what he enjoys about being a concert trucker, and what it takes to do it.

“My average day starts with loading in around 6 am till 10 am, then I go to catering for breakfast or lunch, take a walk, sleep from 1pm to 9pm, load out and continue on to the next show,” shared Cid.

What Skills Does a Concert Trucker Need?

Concert trucking is a great and well-paying job, but there are a number of skills that a concert trucker needs to have to be successful.

The first is comfort with late night driving. While most OTR drivers have some experience with driving at night, for a concert trucker, it’s your bread and butter. That’s because right after a show wraps up, everything needs to get loaded on the trailers and hauled to the next stop. This means starting your route at 11 PM, midnight, or even 2 AM if a show goes that long.

“This is not your average trucking job. We work hard and have plenty of downtime. Each venue is different, and you’ll learn something new every day. You’ll need to adjust your sleep schedule, but once you’re on tour, you get into the rhythm (no pun intended). The camaraderie on these tours is like no other, we are truly one team,” shared Cid.

Leadership and organization are also needed skills as a concert trucker. In addition to driving, concert truckers (specifically Upstaging drivers) supervise the loading and unloading of equipment in and out of the trailers before and after the shows. These skills come into play when you’re on a time crunch trying to get a trailer loaded so you can hit the road and make it to the next destination on time.

When it comes to concert trucking, drivers need to make sure they’re getting into it for the right reasons. If you just want to meet musicians and hang out on the road, concert trucking isn’t the job for you. It’s fun and rewarding, but also takes a serious, dedicated and experienced driver to do it.

Benefits of Concert Trucking with Upstaging

concert trucking“Salary, plus per diem, plus hotel buyout are a few of the perks of working with Upstaging. They lead the industry in driver pay as well. Plus, being a part of a moving project is very satisfying. These shows can’t make the next destination without us,” shared Cid.

There’s a number of benefits to working as a concert trucker, specifically with Upstaging. Here are just a few of them.

Paid by the Day

No more adding miles and calculating things like detention. Upstaging drivers are paid by the day. In other words, if you’re out on a 3-month tour, you’re getting paid for every day of that tour, even days off.

Designated Truck Parking

Also, there’s no need to worry about truck parking as a concert trucker. You won’t need to be parking overnight at a lot, you’ll be parking in an arena or outdoor venue where spots will already be reserved for drivers.

No Touch Freight

Upstaging drivers don’t load and unload their trailers themselves. Instead, they supervise while the crew does it.

Team Atmosphere

Working as a concert trucker means working with a team. You’ll be forming bonds with other drivers and workers you’re on tour with, which is much different from your typical OTR position. Doing your part to put on a show that thousands of people will enjoy is definitely a perk, and one that Cid enjoys.

“When you’re transporting entertainment for thousands and thousands of fans, it’s nice to be part of team working together to achieve a perfect outcome,” shared Cid. 

Additional Benefits

There’s many more quality-of-life benefits to being an Upstaging driver, including:

  • New Tractor Trailers (None older than 4 years)
  • Built-in Fridge
  • Custom Designed Sleeper for Extra Space
  • Catered Meals
  • 28 days PTO per year
  • Schedule-based hotel allowance

Upstaging is Hiring Drivers Nationwide

Drive for the premier transportation company in entertainment and make over $100,000 Yearly!


Over the past few years, there’s been a lot of talk about driverless trucks and the impact they’ll have on the trucking industry. But, it’s important for drivers worried about their jobs to not give in to the sensationalist headlines. While driverless trucks are definitely the wave of the future, they won’t be replacing truck drivers in the foreseeable future. Here’s the basics on driverless trucks and why truck drivers will still be needed, no matter what.  

What is a Driverless Truck?

A driverless truck is any semi-truck that has at least some level of autonomy. SAE International, (formerly the Society of Automotive Engineers has laid out six levels of automation in regard to semi-trucks.   

Level 0 is no automation, and level 1 includes assisted steering and lane departure warnings. Level 5 is a fully automated truck that can drive itself, even in inclement weather without needing a driver. Most companies are introducing level 2-3 automation right now, with level 5 only happening in controlled demonstrations.  

Driverless trucks have been in development by dozens of companies over the last ten years. Big companies like Tesla and Waymo (Subsidiary of Alphabet Inc., the company that owns Google) have been developing self-driving technology for years. There’s also lesser-known tech companies like Plus, TuSimple and Embark that have already gotten billions of dollars in investor funding for their trucks. While there’s a lot of money going into driverless truck technology, drivers shouldn’t be worrying. 

What Do They Mean for Truck Drivers?

While it makes sense on the surface, it’s a common misconception that driverless trucks will put drivers out of jobs. Since most companies are only testing level 2-3 automation right now, the trucks aren’t doing everything themselves. And even when level 5 trucks are on the road, an experienced driver will still need to be in the truck at all times in case something goes wrong. 

That’s because truck drivers do more than just drive. A truck can’t load and unload freight or talk to customers and dispatch about the details of an order. This means that truck driver jobs will be more than safe for the foreseeable future.  

What’s the Future for Self-Driving Trucks?

As of right now, it’s full steam ahead for the companies investing time and resources in driverless technology. Some in the industry believe we’ll begin seeing driverless trucks as the norm in the next decade, but this estimate may be a little optimistic.  

Yes, the big players in driverless trucking are talking about implementing the technology, but it’s still a long way from happening on a large scale. The majority of trucking companies, especially smaller ones, don’t have the money to use this technology within their fleets anytime soon. But, even if and when that does happen, trained drivers will still be needed in the cab at all times. If you’re a truck driver, don’t spend time worrying about driverless trucks any time soon. 

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What is the Vaccine Mandate?

In early November, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) issued an emergency order that starting in early January, all companies with 100 or more employees would be required to implement a vaccine mandate for all employees or do weekly testing for those who wish to remain unvaccinated. The announcement caused a stir in a lot of industries, especially trucking. Here’s all the latest news on OSHA’s recent announcement and how it will affect truck drivers.  

What’s the Latest News?

A similar mandate will be put into place by the Canadian government in early January. This will require U.S. drivers who go across the border to provide proof of vaccination before entering the country. The compliance date for U.S drivers entering Canada to be vaccinated is January 15th, 2022. While proponents of the mandate say it will help curb the number of people infected with the virus, opponents say it will add stress to an already stretched supply chain. 

cdl driving test

The Supreme Court held an emergency hearing on the subject on Friday, January 7. The court is deciding whether or not the executive branch has the authority to implement such an order. While we don’t know when the court will make a ruling, it’s likely that it will be sooner rather than later, due to the urgency of the issue.  Early reports indicate that the court is leaning towards blocking the mandate. 

The American Trucking Association, (ATA) had this to say about the mandate,  

“Based on survey data, we believe a vaccine mandate would fuel a surge in driver turnover and attrition, with fleets losing as much as 37% percent of their current driver workforce to retirement or smaller carriers not subject to the mandate.” 

How Will the Vaccine Mandate Affect Drivers?

The mandate states that any company with 100 or more employees will need to issue a vaccinate mandate or have employees tested weekly. There are a few exemptions to this rule that will affect truck drivers;

  • Employees who do not report to a workplace where other individuals are present 
  • Employees who work from home 
  • Employees who work exclusively outdoors  

OSHA had this to say about how the mandate will affect truck drivers specifically,

“There is no specific exemption from the standard’s requirements for truck drivers. However, paragraph (b)(3) provides that, even where the standard applies to a particular employer, its requirements do not apply to employees “who do not report to a workplace where other individuals such as coworkers or customers are present” or employees “who work exclusively outdoors.” Therefore, the requirements of the ETS do not apply to truck drivers who do not occupy vehicles with other individuals as part of their work duties. Additionally, the requirements of the ETS do not apply to truck drivers who encounter other individuals exclusively in outdoor environments. On the other hand, the requirements of the ETS apply to truck drivers who work in teams (e.g., two people in a truck cab) or who must routinely enter buildings where other people are present. However, de minimis use of indoor spaces where other individuals may be present (e.g., using a multi-stall bathroom, entering an administrative office only to drop off paperwork) does not preclude an employee from being covered by these exemptions, as long as time spent indoors is brief, or occurs exclusively in the employee’s home (e.g., a lunch break at home). OSHA will look at cumulative time spent indoors to determine whether that time is de minimis.”

While most company drivers will fall under these exemptions, this would not cover drivers who work in teams or drivers who need to go inside buildings regularly for trainings or orientation, but once again, it’s unclear how OSHA will treat these cases.  

How Will it Affect Employers?

Employers, just like drivers, will need to comply with the new regulation. Some in the industry worry that the mandate will give an unfair hiring advantage to companies who employ less than 100 people that don’t have to comply with the regulation. 

While this would be the first time the government has mandated vaccination for workers, many employers in the trucking industry have already been requiring vaccination for their drivers for some time now. This means that not much will change for them. 

As of right now, this story is still unfolding, and a lot could change between now and if and when the vaccine mandate goes into effect. That includes a possible Supreme Court ruling that would make OSHA’s emergency order unconstitutional. Make sure to look online regularly for updates to stay informed on how this will impact you or your company.  

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sprinter van driver jobs

What is a Sprinter Van?

While the phrase “Sprinter Van” has almost become interchangeable with “Cargo Van,” a Sprinter is actually the brand name for a van exclusively manufactured by Mercedes-Benz. Sprinter Vans have been around since the mid-90s in both cargo and passenger models, but have just recently skyrocketed in popularity. This is thanks to the trend of people downsizing by living in them along with Amazon using them as their go-to delivery vans over the past few years.  But, it’s not just the big box carriers like Amazon who are looking to fill these Sprinter Van Driver Jobs. Delivery companies all over the country are looking for drivers to complete the all-important “Final Mile” in the logistics chain. This gives prospective Sprinter Van Drivers a great amount of leverage in finding the right job for them.  

Like with every driving job, there’s pros and cons, and that’s definitely true with Sprinter Van jobs. If you’re thinking about making the jump into Sprinter Van driving, here’s what you need to know about this line of work. 

Pros 

No CDL Required

Maybe the biggest plus for people considering driving Sprinter Vans is that there’s no CDL requirement. Some states have a few additional requirements for delivery drivers, including proof of a clean driving record and the ability to pass a physical and drug test. Aside from that and passing any company training, there’s nothing stopping you from hitting the road. 

Part-Time Possibilities

You’ve probably heard of people who work on the weekends or during the holidays for Amazon as part-time delivery drivers. In addition to getting experience driving a large vehicle, working as a Sprinter Van Driver is also a great job for someone trying to make a little extra money on the side. 

Easier Path to Owner Operator

Another benefit to driving Sprinter Vans is that there’s a much easier path to becoming an Owner Operator than there is with a traditional semi-truck.  The starting MSRP for a new Sprinter Cargo Van is $36,000. Compare that to the average price for a commercial truck, which is anywhere from $130,000-$200,000 and you can see why so many people are looking to buy Sprinters instead.  

Home Time

While there are a few exceptions, most Sprinter Van Drivers can expect to be home every night. The shifts might be long, but you’ll still make it to your own bed at the end of each day, which can’t be said for all trucking jobs.  

Cons 

Tight Deadlines

You’ve probably heard already, but being a Sprinter Van driver can be a very stressful job. Drivers are expected to deliver close to 300 packages per shift. While some might enjoy this fast-paced environment, it definitely isn’t a role for everyone, especially drivers with physical limitations. 

Customer Service

Another element involved in Sprinter Van driving that may be overlooked is customer service. In addition to driving, you may be dealing with customers who can sometimes prove to be difficult. This won’t be a problem for some, but many drivers got into this line of work to avoid these types of interactions altogether.  

Physically Demanding

With Sprinter Van Driver jobs, it’s almost certain that you’ll be working with touch cargo. This may not be a huge deal for drivers unloading one or two big deliveries a day, but it’s a much different beast when you’re a Sprinter Van Driver. Delivering hundreds of packages and walking up and down driveways for 8+ hours a day makes this one of the most physically intensive jobs you can do in the logistics industry. On the flip side, if you’re looking for a job that will get you fit while you earn some money, look no further.  

If you’re a disciplined worker who doesn’t mindor even enjoysa bit of stress, Sprinter Van driving could be the right career path for you. It’s also a great job for those considering a career in trucking but want to try their hand at something smaller before going through the process of getting their CDL. And with the wide variety of jobs available in Sprinter Van Driving, there’s no doubt that you’ll find the job right for you. 

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best trucker gps
While almost everyone has a cell phone these days, it may not be the most helpful tool if you’re a driver who often spends hours (or days) on the road. Using a GPS designed specifically for truck drivers will act as a partner on the road, by helping you navigate through difficult roads or unfamiliar state routes. Below are a few tips to guide you in choosing the best trucker GPS to fit your needs.

Consider What Best Fits You

Finding the right GPS model for you might be easier than you think. Before making your purchase there are a few items worth taking into consideration. The first thing to consider is screen size. Purchasing a GPS with a screen that’s too small can place extra strain on your eyes, making it harder to keep your eyes on the road. On the flip side, if you go with a model that’s too big, you risk blocking your vision.

In your trucker GPS, look for a good screen size as well as Bluetooth and hands-free navigation capabilities.

You should also think about whether or not the GPS comes with built-in Bluetooth capabilities and hands-free voice navigation. Certain models also have the ability to guide you through even the most remote country roads where WI-FI can be nonexistent, which is something that your cell phone won’t be able to do. Using a unit with a voice navigation function will not only make things easier for you but can also cut down potential distractions, allowing you to stay focused on the road ahead.

Remember: It’s All About the Features

semi truck dashboardTrucker GPS systems also come loaded with special features that you won’t find on your standard smartphone. Whether you’re looking to track your fuel usage, the number of miles you’ve driven, your tire mileage, or just curious about the nearest fuel stop, your GPS can provide you with all of that information. A good system will also alert you to changes in routine traffic patterns, hazardous conditions, weight restrictions, low overpasses, and more – all in real-time.

All of the features mentioned above will help keep you on the most efficient routes possible. And, most importantly, your GPS can help make sure you stay within HOS Compliance at all times, making the roads a safer place for everyone involved. This will allow you to deliver your loads on time, help ensure that you get the pay you deserve, and that you make it home on time.

Enjoy the Benefit of Automatic Updates

Additionally, many of the newer GPS models provide users with the benefits of automatic updates. This will help ensure that you have the most up-to-date software at your fingertips every time you get behind the wheel without the need for complicated instructions or flipping through manuals. Your system will always be up-to-date without you having to buy new equipment or software every single time.

Do Your Homework!

Happy trucker driverIt’s important to do your research before deciding on the best trucker GPS system that’s right for you and your life on the road. A simple internet search can lead you to a number of products on the market, as well as their reviews – many of which have been written by actual drivers. Use their feedback to walk you through the good, the bad, and the in-between before making your final purchase.

Remember that choosing the best GPS is all about finding the right option that fits your needs. Make sure that it comes with all of the features and functions that will help improve your driving experience. This will allow you to get a better feel for the product and everything it offers before making your selection.

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