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Ergon Trucking

Today’s job of the day comes from Ergon Trucking

Ergon Trucking is a company that works. We’re family owned and operated, brought together more than six decades ago in the petroleum industry’s service sectors. Driven by the values of hard work, customer service, reliable supply, and quality products, we’ve grown steadily and strategically over the years to become a well-diversified organization.

We specialize in the transport of products with rigorous handling requirements, sensitive temperature requirements, critical delivery timing, and crucial safety precautions. The company transports a diversity of products, including crude oil; lube oils; asphalt and emulsions; as well as specialty oils, caustics, and chemicals. Must have valid CDL with Tank and Hazmat endorsements to qualify.

We are a liquid tank carrier looking for OTR Hazmat/Tanker company drivers and independent contractors in multiple locations across the United States.

Company drivers are being hired in Houston, TX | Pittsburgh, PA | Baton Rouge, LA | Shreveport, LA | Marietta, OH | Sulphur, LA | Vicksburg, MS

Perks and Highlights:

  • 401(k) and profit sharing
  • Paid holiday & vacation time (two weeks after first year)
  • Health and dental care
  • Uniforms provided

We offer excellent pay and benefits that include:

  • 24% of load pay (75K – 90K annually)
  • Direct Deposit
  • $3,500 sign-on bonus ($1,500 at sign-on, $1,000 after 90 days, $1,000 after 6 months)
  • Safety bonus up to $2,000 per year
  • Home time – Out and back freight so we try to get you home weekly if possible but no guarantee depending on freight movement and time of year.
  • Late model Peterbilt and Kenworth with manual transmissions

Independent Contractors are being hired in Newell, WV | Vicksburg, MS | Shreveport, LA

Perks and Highlights:

  • 100% of fuel surcharge
  • Fuel discounts with various vendors
  • Free truck washes
  • Frequent home time, don’t require multiple weeks on the road
  • Electronic logging at no cost
  • Paid tolls and EZ Pass
  • Roadside assistance
  • Most loads are out and back with flexible schedules

We offer excellent pay and benefits that include:

  • $5,000 sign-on bonus ($2500 at sign-on, $1250 after 90 days, $1250 after 6 months)
  • Up to $6,600 in Safety/Operations bonuses
  • Average 200-300k gross yearly
  • 65% of load pay
  • 85% of demurrage pay (paid weekly with loads)
  • Permits paid
  • Offer insurance options if needed

Interested in applying?

Learn more about the job requirements, benefits, pay and more.

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5 Top Trucking Movies to WatchTrucker drivers are an interesting bunch. And for good reason—they have an interesting job! Hollywood has paid attention to the trucker life over the years, and made many movies about trucking, truckers, or the over the road lifestyle. For all the movies made about trucking, we’ve narrowed things down to our favorites, and our drivers’ favorites. Here are 5 top trucking movies to watch.

1. Smokey and the Bandit


Let’s start with a true classic. Burt Reynolds and Jerry Reed star in Smokey and Bandit. It was a box office smash in 1977 and was the 2nd highest grossing movies of the year. The movie came in 2nd, only behind the original Star Wars movie. This classic trucking movie brought the life of some extreme highway antics to the big screen, and added a lot of drama and laughs along the way. The plot starts with some guys needing to bootleg cases of Coors beer across state lines, at a time where doing that was very illegal. Add to the mix a runaway bride, an angry sheriff and sweet, sweet Trans Am, it’s a very entertaining watch.

2. Black Dog


Black dog came out in 1998 and stars the late Patrick Swayze. Though it was never a box office hit, it is consistently noted as a truck driver favorite. It’s full of action, drama and many action-packed driving scenes. Swayze’s character, Jack Crews, is a truck driver who served time for vehicular manslaughter. Once out of prison, he’s putting his life back together, and struggling to make ends meet. So, he takes a somewhat sketchy job back on the road. The job was supposed to be an easy run. And it was easy, until Crews realizes he’s hauling illegal firearms and there’s people out there set on hijacking the load. Watch this one for the jam-packed action scenes, and the drama of man trying to get back to work to save his family.

3. Duel


Another film from the 1970s is Duel. It was notably Steven Spielberg’s feature-length debut as a director. Starring Dennis Weaver, this movie is a take on a classic cat and mouse chase between a traveling salesman and a mysterious tanker truck driver. And the unseen trucker really seems intent on making the salesman’s drive one he’ll never forget. Full of suspense, the car and truck keep meeting up at every turn. And each meetup it seems the crazed trucker gets increasingly aggressive and menacing to the salesman. Road rage is one thing. But this trucker’s gone way beyond that.

4. Convoy


Another true classic trucking movie from the late 1970’s is Convoy. The movie stars Kris Kristofferson as Rubber Duck and was inspired by the classic trucker tune “Convoy” by C.W. McCall. Taking all of the excitement and colorful CB-radio language that is the backdrop of the song, the movie centers around truckers banding together in a convoy to protect Rubber Duck from a sheriff out to get him. A song turned into a movie, that centers around the solid loyalty that exists within the trucking community – that is Convoy. It’s action packed. And it also has some laughs and plenty of drama for any trucker who feels a bond with their fellow truckers on the road.

5. Big Rig


Switching gears from over-the-top action, adventure and Hollywood stunts, let’s look at a small scale trucking movie. Made in 2007, Big Rig is documentary film centered around the reality of  truck driving. It takes a real life look at the life on the road. The stars of the movie are the drivers that agreed to allow the crew to tag along and see what they see, and experience what it’s like to be a trucker. It about the drivers, their lives, and why they do what they do. Big Rig is about the perspective of a diverse group of drivers. And it provides several interesting viewpoints over the course of the film. If someone needs a real look inside of 18-wheeler, this trucking movie should be on your short-list to watch soon.

Knowing that truck drivers usually have plenty of free time when they’re away from home and done driving for the day, movies can be a great escape before bedtime. We know many drivers keep a tablet or other device on the truck, why not use them to watch a movie? Let us know what your favorite movie is. Click on the link below and let us know what you think.

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The 3 Perks of Intermodal Trucking
Specialty truck drivers have a great opportunity within the trucking industry. And certainly, a specialty is intermodal. Intermodal trucking can be a great option for truckers looking for a new gig over the road. And for those drivers looking to change up their schedules and find some additional work/life balance, and potentially a little less wear and tear physically, here are 3 perks in the life of an intermodal trucker.

Intermodal: What is It?

Before we talk about the perks of intermodal trucking, we first need to discuss what intermodal transportation means. Intermodal transportation is moving cargo in specially designed containers, using a combination of shipping methods to get the cargo from point A to point B.

The containers are weather-hardy and fit securely on several types of transport. A sample intermodal delivery might start with overseas freight shipping to a US port on a cargo ship. Trains pick up the containers from the ports and deliver to a rail station. And from there, a truck driver picks up the container. This is one example, but it really is any combination of moving these containers by air, sea, rail or over the road. Now that we have discussed what it is, let’s take a look at the perks for someone considering a job as an intermodal driver.

1. Consistent Schedule

Photo courtesy of David, an Intermodal Truck Driver

If a healthy work/life balance is important to you and your lifestyle, intermodal trucking might be a good choice for you.

We spoke with an intermodal truck driver, David, and he shared his experience on the road:

“Intermodal provides the ability to make great money and be home daily. But the tradeoff is a lot of frustration and hold ups in the railyards,” shares David.

Driving from shipyards and railyards usually works on the same schedule of those workers, so a steady 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM and sleeping at home daily isn’t out of the question. In this case, the containers are dependable and so are the work hours.

2. Less Labor and Packing

The shipping containers move from transport vehicle to transport vehicle. They stay packed as is and sealed from the time they leave, until they get to their destination. This means the truck drivers don’t need to do too much work for pickup and delivery, and they certainly don’t need to load and unload like what might be necessary with a trailer.

At each stop the container moves to, there’s specialty equipment there to pick up the containers and place them on the trucks. It’s usually no touch for the drivers, which means less wear and tear on your body, and more time moving down the road.

3. Flexibility

Photo courtesy of Ritsuko, an Intermodal Truck Driver

Some drivers find a real perk to be the flexibility that intermodal trucking provides to a driver. We talked to another intermodal truck driver, Ritsuko, and she shared what she loves about intermodal trucking, including seeing the country and making money.

“I enjoy the independence and peace of being on the road and being able to take off when needed and having more flexibility in my schedule,” shares Ritsuko.

If you’re looking for an new opportunity, or a job with the intermodal trucking perks we mention here, let us help.  At Drive My Way we can help you find a new job, perfect for you. We’ve got plenty of intermodal opportunities, and one might be a great fit for you.

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button transportation

Today’s job of the day comes from Button Transportation

Button Transportation is a family-owned and operated business in California and has been thriving for over 40 years. Their fertilizer and harvest transportation work is the backbone of their business. At Button Transportation, “we help farmers reap what we help them sow.”

Button is currently hiring CDL A Regional Tanker Drivers in Dixon, CA and CDL A OTR Tanker Drivers nationwide. Regional Tanker drivers will be responsible for organic material. The OTR position for a Food Grade Cargo and is hiring from all 48 states (except Maine and Florida). Both positions are no touch freight. Drivers must connect the hose, open product valves, and monitor the loading and unloading.

Regional Driver Compensation & Benefits:

  • Percentage based pay 25% to start. Increases every year.
  • Average weekly pay $1,000
  • Additional pay: Waiting time, 34-hr restart
  • Weekly pay via direct deposit
  • Benefits package –
  • Medical, Dental and Vision benefits effectively starts after 30 days
    • 401K program with 50% company match up to 10% of paycheck
    • Year-end bonus program
    • $100 Driver Referral Bonus Program

OTR Driver Compensation & Benefits:

  • CPM pay – Depending on experience – $0.46-$0.53
  • Avg miles per week – 2,500 miles
  • Additional pay: Waiting time, 34-hr restart
  • Average weekly pay: $1,150 – $1,325 (pending on experience)
  • Weekly pay via direct deposit
  • Rider program for relatives or spouse 18+ (with proper paperwork)
  • Benefits package –
  • Medical, Dental and Vision benefits effectively starts after 30 days
    • 401K program with 50% company match up to 10% of paycheck
    • Year-end bonus program
    • $100 Driver Referral Bonus Program

Routes & Schedule:

  • Regional Tanker Driver: Routes starting in Dixon California to surrounding area’s with some Oregon loads
    • Home most nights (some weekends home)
  • OTR Tanker Driver: Running all 48 states (except Maine and Florida)
    • Home Time: As needed, no forced dispatch
    • Take home truck program

Equipment:

  • New VNL Volvo’s with sleepers or day cab
  • Automatic and manual options available
  • Tanker endorsement preferred – Required to obtain prior to hire
  • Willing to train on tanker

Qualifications:

  • Class A CDL
  • Minimum age 22
  • Minimum of 1 year OTR driving experience
  • Regional: Prefer TWIC – will reimburse
  • Good MVR and safe driving record, including no BACs, DUIs, DWIs, or license suspensions for moving violations in the past 5 years
  • Ability to meet work attendance and availability requirements and pass all CFI certification class testing and requirements
  • Have legal right to work and live in the United State

Button offers great benefits, competitive pay, and a wonderful company culture.

Why drivers love working for Button:

Johnny Green

“I started working for Button the day after I obtained my CDL. It’s very difficult to find a good job when you’re new to the industry but at Button I found a GREAT job and was welcomed with open arms and treated with respect.”

Eduardo Felix

“From day one it been great, wonderful people and staff to work with. Bob Button is a class act, active, interested owner that is only a phone call away. Dispatchers Dan, Gene and Jeff are the best. Highly recommend company to work for.”

 

Interested in applying?

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Regional Tanker  OTR Tanker

3 Things you Should Know Before Becoming a Driver Trainer

Looking back on how you got started in trucking, what’s the one thing every trucker had in common? Every driver needed someone to teach them how to drive their first truck. And for many professional drivers, the person who trained them is the voice they still hear in their head when out on the road. All that good early advice, best practices, and reassurances might still help you safely navigate over the road today. After a few years of driving, that voice might now be one telling you to make the move into the classroom and teach the next generation of drivers. So, if you’re hearing the call to be a truck driver trainer, here’s 3 things to know when getting started.

1. Basic Qualifications

The qualifications for becoming a driver trainer vary by state, however, there are some general qualifications that are necessary to become a driver trainer. First, you must be a CDL driver for at least 2+ years. Second, you also need to have a very clean driving record. Some states require a written test, and depending on the state, some require successfully passing a course for trainers.

If you’re looking into moving to the classroom, the best thing to do is check with your state for the exact requirements for becoming a driver trainer.

2. Ability to Deal with Students

For many people, patience is a virtue. And teaching takes a lot of patience. If you are someone who doesn’t have patience as a core competency, becoming a driver trainer might not be your best bet. Driver trainees will make mistakes and a trainer must be there to help work through the mistakes.

Paul Driver Trainer

Paul Adams
CDL Driver Trainer and Instructor

We spoke to Paul Adams, a CDL Trainer and Instructor, and he shared some great tips.

“One piece of advice I would give anyone in the trucking world is believe in yourself before you get started. Always be patient and attentive to the craft. What worked for you may not work for others. Help them find their grove, make them just as comfortable as you was learning for yourself,” shared Paul.

In addition, the trainer must also instill the skills and training to ensure the same mistakes aren’t made again. If you are looking to change your path to become a teacher, be sure that you’ve got an open mind and will work well with students.

3. Safety is a Priority for a Driver Trainer

Safety in trucking should be a priority for all professional truck drivers. But is it something that you’ve been extremely cognizant of during your driving career? A great safety record and a history of following all safety guidelines and rules are a must for anyone looking to become a driver trainer.

The best trainers are ones that model the behaviors that they’re teaching.

If you feel like you’re a good fit for the job, becoming a driver trainer is a great logical step in your career path as a trucker. It’s a great opportunity to stay in the industry, and get more home time. And it’s certainly a more predictable schedule week after week. Take the time to research your state’s requirements, and see if you’re a good fit. Becoming a trainer could be a very rewarding job for you.

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6 Types of CDL Class A Endorsements

There are three options when getting a commercial driver’s license (CDL): the CDL A, the CDL B or the CDL C. Each class has its own training requirements and testing procedures, and there are pros and cons to explore for each type. Your lifestyle and career plans dictate which license will be the best fit for you. The Class A CDL is the most widely obtained CDL license, and here are the 6 types of endorsements you can get once you obtain a Class A CDL License.

The Basics of a Class A CDL

A Class A CDL endorsement usually opens the most job opportunities for a driver. The Federal Motor Carrier Association defines CDL A trucks as, “Any combination of vehicles which has a gross combination weight rating or gross combination weight of 11,794 kilograms or more (26,001 pounds or more) whichever is greater, inclusive of a towed unit(s) with a gross vehicle weight rating or gross vehicle weight of more than 4,536 kilograms (10,000 pounds) whichever is greater.”

Once you have your CDL A license, you can get additional endorsements to allow you drive more specialty vehicles. These endorsements require extra written and sometimes, skills testing to obtain the endorsements.

There are 6 Types of CDL Class A Endorsements

commercial driver's license endorsements

U.S. Department of Transportation

1. (H) Hazardous Materials (HAZMAT)

A HAZMAT endorsement opens the doors to hauling hazardous materials over the road. These jobs are often higher paying and there is usually a larger pool of jobs available. Once you have your CDL A, you can obtain a HAZMAT endorsement following required TSA background checks, a written test, as well as a medical exam by a DOT doctor. In many cases having your HAZMAT license is a requirement for getting the X endorsement which will be described shortly.

2. (N) Tank Vehicle

The tank endorsement allows a driver to haul a tank or “tanker” full of liquid or gaseous materials. These jobs are often higher paying and usually are local or regional runs, so you’d have more home time than some other jobs. This endorsement does require an additional written test. A tanker truck driver needs to be able to adjust to having his cargo constantly moving around if the tank is not full. Dealing with the “surge” caused by the movement of the liquid in the tank while driving, does take some practice and skill development.

commuter bus passenger endorsement3. (P) Passenger Transport

Passenger transport endorsement is pretty straightforward. It allows a licensed driver to drive a vehicle which carries more than 16 passengers, like a city commuter bus. This endorsement requires an added written and skills test to obtain. These jobs are great for people who want to drive a set schedule and be home every night, or for seeing the country driving for travel companies across country. One thing is certain, you will interact with passengers all day long, so this is not the job for someone who likes being alone. This endorsement is usually required to subsequently obtain the S endorsement to drive children in a school bus. Usually the S & P endorsements go hand-in-hand.

4. (S) School Bus/Passenger Transport

School bus endorsements are required to drive children around in school busses. Like the P endorsement just discussed, this also requires an additional written and driving skills test. But for the S endorsement, there are also background checks, criminal history checks, physical fitness tests, and they usually require more frequent supplemental training and testing when the school bus rules change. And these drivers should have a little more patience and certainly must be able to tolerate driving boisterous children.

doubles triples endorsement5. (T) Double/Triples

Double or triple trailers require their own endorsement. The T endorsement allows drivers to tow more than one trailer on the back of their truck. This endorsement requires an additional written test as well. The T endorsement allows a driver to haul twice or even three-times more freight, while driving the same amount of time over the road as with a single trailer. These are often higher-paying trucking jobs, due to the added skills and driving ability the driver needs to have.

6. (X) Tanker and Hazardous Materials

Finally, the X endorsement allows a driver to haul large loads of any type of liquid or gaseous HAZMAT cargo inside of a tanker. Having this X endorsement even further separates these drivers and their skill sets. This endorsement requires an additional written test. If a driver has any plans to be in the gas and oil hauling business, an X endorsement will certainly be required.

Regardless of the type of license and endorsements you pursue, you need to ensure that you are matched with the best fit job for you. If you’re a newly licensed professional truck driver looking for your first road job, or you’ve been driving for years, let Drive My Way help you get connected with the perfect job for you.

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What Does It Take to Be a Car Hauler Truck Driver?

One of the most recognizable trucks on the road is a car hauler. Those big double-decker rigs, bringing shiny new cars to dealerships across the country. Easily recognizable, and something that might be an excellent, and lucrative choice for a job in trucking. If you are interested in a job delivering cars, here’s what it takes to be a car hauler truck driver.

Basic Qualifications

When looking for a new truck driver job, you usually need to start with meeting the basic qualifications. And a car hauler must meet basic requirements to be considered for the job.

First thing you need to have is a Class A CDL driver’s license and all the requirements from the Department of Transportation that go along with getting your license.

Over the Road Experience

So you’ve got your license, and now you need some practice navigating over the road. Long hauls across the country, winding roads, crowded city streets: these are all things that you’ll need real world experience when you’re getting ready to deliver cars. Once you’ve been driving for a while, in most cases 1 or 2 years, you might want to start looking at your opportunities for first car hauling job.

Car haulers usually need 2 years of experience for insurance requirements, but it can  vary by state or by job.

No matter what the time is, the goal is to get plenty of experience with driving safely, learning the ropes, and keeping your record clean.

Clean Driving Record

With the value of the cargo for a car hauler, there’s a lot of risk that goes into this job. These drivers always have to be safe drivers. Frequently, these drivers are hauling a dozen or more brand-new sedans. Sometimes your haul might be someone’s private collection of extremely expensive antique cars. Other times, you’re hauling burned-out wrecks headed for scrapyards.

No matter what the load, if you are considering a job as a car hauler, ensure that you have a clean driving record.

Additionally, these drivers are subject to all the standard drug testing rules, if not more, due to the high cost of the loads.

Total Attention to Detail

This is a tough job. It requires total attention to detail at every step. As most car haulers are usually responsible for loading and unloading the cars, they not only have to transport them safely, they need to get them on and off the truck safely. This means 100% perfection in your routine while spacing the cars and strapping them down in place. No damage in transit or during delivery is paramount to your paycheck.

It might take years of practice getting to the point where you’re ready to work as a car hauler, but a few years in a specialized trucking field can be the best step to getting there.

Car hauler jobs come in a few shapes and sizes. From the open-sided double-decker rigs carrying new cars to dealerships across the country, to enclosed trailers hauling one of a kind cars for a private collection, getting into hauling cars might be a great job for you. If this is the next job you’re looking for, complete a Drive My Way profile. We work hard to match you to the exact truck driving job that’s best for you.

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How to Vote as a Truck Driver Over the Road

Do you know where you will be on Tuesday, November 3, 2020? That’s the date of this year’s Presidential Election. Some truckers know their schedules months in advance, but for many, it’s hard to plan ahead too far. Many long-haul truckers can safely bet that they won’t be home that Tuesday. And for the many things that professional truck drivers miss out on being away from home, you don’t have to miss out on voting! So for those truckers planning ahead, here’s some tips for how to vote as a truck driver over the road.

Are You Registered to Vote?

Every American citizen, 18 years or older, can vote in the United States.  Patriotic truck drivers are no exception to that rule. But first you need to be registered before you submit your first ballot. If you’re not sure if you’re already registered, start here. You can check your registration status, find your local voting information, and get registered if needed.

Whether you like all of the candidates or plan to vote for every issue on your local ballot, in order to even have the opportunity to cast a single vote, you must be registered first.

Get an Absentee Ballot

Once registered, there’s a few ways to cast a vote as a truck driver. Since there’s a good chance you won’t be home that day, you can request an absentee ballot. An absentee ballot allows a registered voter the ability to request a ballot in the mail to be submitted prior to the actual election day. This does take some effort ahead of the election to coordinate the steps you need to take.

The absentee ballot process requires you to:

  1. Complete the form to request the ballot
  2. Complete and send the form in the mail
  3. Receive your ballot in the mail
  4. Complete your ballot
  5. Return your ballot either by mail or in person prior to the deadline set by your state

If you plan ahead and follow the steps, you can still exercise your right to vote, even if you’re away from home! Every state is a little bit different, so be sure you’re aware of all of the rules. Some states do all of their ballots by mail, so this can help a trucker get their vote counted.

Vote Early

How to Vote as a Truck Driver Over the RoadIf the absentee ballot process is not going to work for you, there still might be another choice available. Many states offer their residents the ability to vote early in-person. Each of the states that allow early voting, have unique rules governing early voting. So if you live in a state that allows early voting, you might be able to coordinate your at home schedule to accommodate a trip to a local polling place when you’re at home. This way you can still vote as a truck driver, and make your voice heard.

We know the life of an over the road driver can be challenging. But with these tips, you should be able to plan ahead and vote successfully. And no matter who you’re planning to vote for, get registered and vote this year. Every vote counts!

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How to Create a Career Path as a Truck Driver

Once you’ve determined that a CDL truck driver job is right for you, how do you get started? And where does the job take you? How long of a haul are you hoping to run? Whether you are starting at age 20 or at age 50, this is a crucial decision. So, when it comes to creating your trucking career path, here are some tips to get you started.

Getting Started

The first thing you need to do, is get a CDL license. But what exact type of license should you get to start? You want to get the right license for the work you’re hoping to do. Once you’ve made up your mind on the type of driving that interests you, you can work to get the correct endorsements.

We spoke with Trucker Style Shawn, a truck driver and now fleet owner, and he shared his advice for new drivers getting started in their trucking career.

Trucker Style Shawn

Trucker Style Shawn

“CDL school will only teach you the bare minimum just to pass your test. The real training is when you go out with a trainer with whatever company you choose. Now I own and operate my fleet of 33 trucks. I went into trucking knowing I wanted to grow a business. I am 30 now and think it has all paid off so far,” shared Shawn.

Getting your CDL license is the place to start when putting together your trucking career path. The process can take some time, but if you’re well prepared, you can work through the steps with ease.

Finding the Sweet Spot

Once you’ve logged a few years on the road, and have a solid safety and driving record, it might be time to start thinking about your options. When preparing for a job change, there’s plenty of things to consider. Is more money a big motivation? Or more time at home is what you’re after? Or perhaps you want to move out from being a company driver to become an owner/operator.

At this point in your career, it’s important to take stock of everything you like and dislike about driving, and carefully weigh it against what your goals are. Then take the necessary steps to move into the best role that aligns with your goals.

Ending Your Time on the Road

Once you’re ready to hang up your keys, there’s plenty of options for a trucker outside of driving. You can become a mentor to young drivers. Or get into a training role to teach those just getting into trucking. Outside of roles helping new drivers, there’s so many other roles that might also be appealing. Your employer might have opportunities available in the office or the warehouse that might be a good fit.

We spoke to another truck driver, Emily Ann, and she shared her advice for finding a company that meets your qualifications and lifestyle preferences.

Emily Ann Trucker Barbie

Emily Ann

“Experience is the biggest thing. Find a company that will train you then you can go anywhere. Don’t jump from job to job. It’s a red flag for companies. I didn’t start right of school because the only people wanting to hire me at the time was over the road companies, and I wasn’t ready to do that. A couple months later I got a job driving a tanker delivering motor oil,” shared Emily.

Many times, retired drivers have great luck working at the office. Who is a better choice to work inside the office, than a driver with years of experience.

Every truck driver has a story about how they got into their career. And they have a story about the many roles they’ve had over the years. Chances are, there’s no 2 stories exactly alike. The standard career path doesn’t really exist. So like every driver, their story of route they took from start to finish is probably a unique one.

If you are looking for the next chapter in your truck driving story, let us help! If you’re looking for a great trucking job that pays well and meet your needs, sign up here for a profile and see what matches we’ve got for you.

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How to Easily Reduce Truck Driver Stress on the Job

Stress. Everyone has stress in their lives. But for a truck driver, when stress impacts their life, it can truly be dangerous. If a driver is stressed and it impacts their thinking or decision-making, it is something that needs to be addressed. Immediately. Because truckers are bombarded with distractions all day long while trying to concentrate and drive safely, it can be hard to find ways to reduce added stress from their lives. But we’ve found a few fundamental things that can help. Here are a few ways to easily reduce truck driver stress on the job.

Get Some Sleep

The best way to reduce your stress levels is to be proactive in getting enough sleep. Without the proper amount of sleep, your body struggles to function well. One of the first things affected is your thinking. Decision making is tougher, and your attention span may shorten. All these things will lead to additional stress over the course of the day.

Great advice for any trucker: be sure to get your required hours of shut-eye to maintain a healthy mind, and reduce stress during the day.

Get the best sleep by keeping up with your bedtime routine. Reduce lights and distractions once it’s bed time. Put away your electronics before you get into bed for the night. So that once your head hits the pillow, all you need to do is close your eyes and fall asleep.

Eat to Reduce Truck Driver Stress

Stress eating is a real thing. But what about eating to reduce stress? There are plenty of foods that are known to reduce stress. Foods chock full of vitamins and minerals are known to help fuel your body and help improve your mood. Counter to this, foods without any real nutritional value can have the opposite effect.

Eating sugar or high levels of caffeine might give you a short burst of energy, but leave you dragging later. That’s certain to cause additional stress, and make your day drag even worse.

Avoid foods with short-term effects, and stick with foods that will help you stay healthy for the long haul. Keeping a good balance of foods that taste good and are good for you is a great way to keep stress at bay on the road.

Clear Your Mind with a Story

Concentrating on the road and traffic all day can take a toll on your nerves. Many drivers like to listen to podcasts or stories during the day to help pass the time. Some drivers prefer to listen once the workday is done.

After a long day on the road, many truckers find listening to audiobooks a terrific way to unwind and relax.

Once you are parked for the night, get comfortable, close your eyes, and press play. Transport yourself into a story about history, science fiction, crime dramas, or something light and happy. You can find any number of apps for your phone or tablet to play the audiobooks.

Advice from a Trucker

We asked our Drive My Way Facebook followers to let us know what helps them reduce stress.

Tim Petruccio mentioned a few different things that help him:

  • Tim Petruccio

    Tim Petruccio

    Increase following distances

    3 to 4 mph less than traffic during volume times

  • Turn off the outside noise (radio, phone calls, etc…)
  • Remember you are in control. You have the final say when it comes to YOUR safety
  • Get rest! Don’t spend 3 of your 10 hours on break, watching TV or gaming. Have a good meal, shower and then hit the rack
  • Think about the things you love (family, places, pets, etc.). Then picture yourself returning safely to them

Keeping family and friends close in your mind really can help too. It’s always good to know that no matter how tough your day is, there’s always a way to make the next day better.

Let us know what you think. Sound off on our Facebook post and let us know what you do to help reduce your truck driver stress. We’d love to share your best ideas with our readers!

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