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5 Top Trucking Movies to WatchTrucker drivers are an interesting bunch. And for good reason—they have an interesting job! Hollywood has paid attention to the trucker life over the years, and made many movies about trucking, truckers, or the over the road lifestyle. For all the movies made about trucking, we’ve narrowed things down to our favorites, and our drivers’ favorites. Here are 5 top trucking movies to watch.

1. Smokey and the Bandit


Let’s start with a true classic. Burt Reynolds and Jerry Reed star in Smokey and Bandit. It was a box office smash in 1977 and was the 2nd highest grossing movies of the year. The movie came in 2nd, only behind the original Star Wars movie. This classic trucking movie brought the life of some extreme highway antics to the big screen, and added a lot of drama and laughs along the way. The plot starts with some guys needing to bootleg cases of Coors beer across state lines, at a time where doing that was very illegal. Add to the mix a runaway bride, an angry sheriff and sweet, sweet Trans Am, it’s a very entertaining watch.

2. Black Dog


Black dog came out in 1998 and stars the late Patrick Swayze. Though it was never a box office hit, it is consistently noted as a truck driver favorite. It’s full of action, drama and many action-packed driving scenes. Swayze’s character, Jack Crews, is a truck driver who served time for vehicular manslaughter. Once out of prison, he’s putting his life back together, and struggling to make ends meet. So, he takes a somewhat sketchy job back on the road. The job was supposed to be an easy run. And it was easy, until Crews realizes he’s hauling illegal firearms and there’s people out there set on hijacking the load. Watch this one for the jam-packed action scenes, and the drama of man trying to get back to work to save his family.

3. Duel


Another film from the 1970s is Duel. It was notably Steven Spielberg’s feature-length debut as a director. Starring Dennis Weaver, this movie is a take on a classic cat and mouse chase between a traveling salesman and a mysterious tanker truck driver. And the unseen trucker really seems intent on making the salesman’s drive one he’ll never forget. Full of suspense, the car and truck keep meeting up at every turn. And each meetup it seems the crazed trucker gets increasingly aggressive and menacing to the salesman. Road rage is one thing. But this trucker’s gone way beyond that.

4. Convoy


Another true classic trucking movie from the late 1970’s is Convoy. The movie stars Kris Kristofferson as Rubber Duck and was inspired by the classic trucker tune “Convoy” by C.W. McCall. Taking all of the excitement and colorful CB-radio language that is the backdrop of the song, the movie centers around truckers banding together in a convoy to protect Rubber Duck from a sheriff out to get him. A song turned into a movie, that centers around the solid loyalty that exists within the trucking community – that is Convoy. It’s action packed. And it also has some laughs and plenty of drama for any trucker who feels a bond with their fellow truckers on the road.

5. Big Rig


Switching gears from over-the-top action, adventure and Hollywood stunts, let’s look at a small scale trucking movie. Made in 2007, Big Rig is documentary film centered around the reality of  truck driving. It takes a real life look at the life on the road. The stars of the movie are the drivers that agreed to allow the crew to tag along and see what they see, and experience what it’s like to be a trucker. It about the drivers, their lives, and why they do what they do. Big Rig is about the perspective of a diverse group of drivers. And it provides several interesting viewpoints over the course of the film. If someone needs a real look inside of 18-wheeler, this trucking movie should be on your short-list to watch soon.

Knowing that truck drivers usually have plenty of free time when they’re away from home and done driving for the day, movies can be a great escape before bedtime. We know many drivers keep a tablet or other device on the truck, why not use them to watch a movie? Let us know what your favorite movie is. Click on the link below and let us know what you think.

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The 3 Perks of Intermodal Trucking
Specialty truck drivers have a great opportunity within the trucking industry. And certainly, a specialty is intermodal. Intermodal trucking can be a great option for truckers looking for a new gig over the road. And for those drivers looking to change up their schedules and find some additional work/life balance, and potentially a little less wear and tear physically, here are 3 perks in the life of an intermodal trucker.

Intermodal: What is It?

Before we talk about the perks of intermodal trucking, we first need to discuss what intermodal transportation means. Intermodal transportation is moving cargo in specially designed containers, using a combination of shipping methods to get the cargo from point A to point B.

The containers are weather-hardy and fit securely on several types of transport. A sample intermodal delivery might start with overseas freight shipping to a US port on a cargo ship. Trains pick up the containers from the ports and deliver to a rail station. And from there, a truck driver picks up the container. This is one example, but it really is any combination of moving these containers by air, sea, rail or over the road. Now that we have discussed what it is, let’s take a look at the perks for someone considering a job as an intermodal driver.

1. Consistent Schedule

Photo courtesy of David, an Intermodal Truck Driver

If a healthy work/life balance is important to you and your lifestyle, intermodal trucking might be a good choice for you.

We spoke with an intermodal truck driver, David, and he shared his experience on the road:

“Intermodal provides the ability to make great money and be home daily. But the tradeoff is a lot of frustration and hold ups in the railyards,” shares David.

Driving from shipyards and railyards usually works on the same schedule of those workers, so a steady 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM and sleeping at home daily isn’t out of the question. In this case, the containers are dependable and so are the work hours.

2. Less Labor and Packing

The shipping containers move from transport vehicle to transport vehicle. They stay packed as is and sealed from the time they leave, until they get to their destination. This means the truck drivers don’t need to do too much work for pickup and delivery, and they certainly don’t need to load and unload like what might be necessary with a trailer.

At each stop the container moves to, there’s specialty equipment there to pick up the containers and place them on the trucks. It’s usually no touch for the drivers, which means less wear and tear on your body, and more time moving down the road.

3. Flexibility

Photo courtesy of Ritsuko, an Intermodal Truck Driver

Some drivers find a real perk to be the flexibility that intermodal trucking provides to a driver. We talked to another intermodal truck driver, Ritsuko, and she shared what she loves about intermodal trucking, including seeing the country and making money.

“I enjoy the independence and peace of being on the road and being able to take off when needed and having more flexibility in my schedule,” shares Ritsuko.

If you’re looking for an new opportunity, or a job with the intermodal trucking perks we mention here, let us help.  At Drive My Way we can help you find a new job, perfect for you. We’ve got plenty of intermodal opportunities, and one might be a great fit for you.

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3 Tips to Make the Most of Trucking Load Boards

Empty trucks sitting in the yard aren’t a good thing. And idle freight sitting in a warehouse isn’t a good thing either. Each of these problems cost their owner money, without earning them a dime. If you’re a new carrier or an Owner Operator looking to get started in the trucking industry, but you don’t know where to find your first jobs, a load board might be the perfect place to start. Here are 3 tips to make the most of trucking load boards.

What’s a Load Board?

A popular method for truckers to find freight is by using trucking load boards. Load boards started out literally as physical bulletin boards with printed descriptions of freight needing shipped tacked onto them. Now, these are online tools that electronically connect drivers with loads posted by shippers and brokers.

Carriers and drivers can use load boards to search for freight that fits their equipment and drivers. Shippers and brokers use load boards to post their freight and look for drivers that match-up well.

Now that it’s clear what a load board is, how can a professional driver make the most of trucking load boards?

1. Do Your Research

Getting started with load boards can be a little bit overwhelming at first. There’s a lot of options and each one might work a little differently or ask for information in a slightly different way. A great tip is talk to your fellow truckers and see what they recommend. Or spend some time online and read the reviews of the programs. With some research, you’ll find the tools that best fit your budget and your needs.

These tools should benefit both sides of the shipping equation, and it should be clear that the tools you’re using will do just that.

2. Stand Out

Like any type of matching program, it’s important to stand out. When using trucking load boards, there’s no difference. You want to put in as much information as possible, to ensure that a broker will understand exactly what you’re able to carry and how much of it. This includes your qualifications and your equipment’s specifications. And certainly, at what pay rates you’re willing to accept to haul their freight.

As you work with different load boards, you’ll get more familiar with the type of information to put in your profile to help you find the best jobs quickly.

3. Learn and Adjust

As you learn how to navigate through the various types of trucking load boards, you’ll learn the ins and outs of how they work. You will learn what makes you stand out best to brokers and shippers. And more importantly, you’ll learn what brokers and shippers are good partners for you.

Finding good partners will help you in the long run, by building a network of shippers in the area you cover.

This will ultimately help ensure that you’ve got full loads coming and going while you’re out over the road.

Just like trucking load boards match-up truckers and freight, DriveMyWay matches truckers with their next best fit trucking job. Start now and setup an account! It’s easy, it’s free and you never know… the perfect trucking gig for you might be just around the corner. What are you waiting for?

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How to Create a Career Path as a Truck Driver

Once you’ve determined that a CDL truck driver job is right for you, how do you get started? And where does the job take you? How long of a haul are you hoping to run? Whether you are starting at age 20 or at age 50, this is a crucial decision. So, when it comes to creating your trucking career path, here are some tips to get you started.

Getting Started

The first thing you need to do, is get a CDL license. But what exact type of license should you get to start? You want to get the right license for the work you’re hoping to do. Once you’ve made up your mind on the type of driving that interests you, you can work to get the correct endorsements.

We spoke with Trucker Style Shawn, a truck driver and now fleet owner, and he shared his advice for new drivers getting started in their trucking career.

Trucker Style Shawn

Trucker Style Shawn

“CDL school will only teach you the bare minimum just to pass your test. The real training is when you go out with a trainer with whatever company you choose. Now I own and operate my fleet of 33 trucks. I went into trucking knowing I wanted to grow a business. I am 30 now and think it has all paid off so far,” shared Shawn.

Getting your CDL license is the place to start when putting together your trucking career path. The process can take some time, but if you’re well prepared, you can work through the steps with ease.

Finding the Sweet Spot

Once you’ve logged a few years on the road, and have a solid safety and driving record, it might be time to start thinking about your options. When preparing for a job change, there’s plenty of things to consider. Is more money a big motivation? Or more time at home is what you’re after? Or perhaps you want to move out from being a company driver to become an owner/operator.

At this point in your career, it’s important to take stock of everything you like and dislike about driving, and carefully weigh it against what your goals are. Then take the necessary steps to move into the best role that aligns with your goals.

Ending Your Time on the Road

Once you’re ready to hang up your keys, there’s plenty of options for a trucker outside of driving. You can become a mentor to young drivers. Or get into a training role to teach those just getting into trucking. Outside of roles helping new drivers, there’s so many other roles that might also be appealing. Your employer might have opportunities available in the office or the warehouse that might be a good fit.

We spoke to another truck driver, Emily Ann, and she shared her advice for finding a company that meets your qualifications and lifestyle preferences.

Emily Ann Trucker Barbie

Emily Ann

“Experience is the biggest thing. Find a company that will train you then you can go anywhere. Don’t jump from job to job. It’s a red flag for companies. I didn’t start right of school because the only people wanting to hire me at the time was over the road companies, and I wasn’t ready to do that. A couple months later I got a job driving a tanker delivering motor oil,” shared Emily.

Many times, retired drivers have great luck working at the office. Who is a better choice to work inside the office, than a driver with years of experience.

Every truck driver has a story about how they got into their career. And they have a story about the many roles they’ve had over the years. Chances are, there’s no 2 stories exactly alike. The standard career path doesn’t really exist. So like every driver, their story of route they took from start to finish is probably a unique one.

If you are looking for the next chapter in your truck driving story, let us help! If you’re looking for a great trucking job that pays well and meet your needs, sign up here for a profile and see what matches we’ve got for you.

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How to Easily Reduce Truck Driver Stress on the Job

Stress. Everyone has stress in their lives. But for a truck driver, when stress impacts their life, it can truly be dangerous. If a driver is stressed and it impacts their thinking or decision-making, it is something that needs to be addressed. Immediately. Because truckers are bombarded with distractions all day long while trying to concentrate and drive safely, it can be hard to find ways to reduce added stress from their lives. But we’ve found a few fundamental things that can help. Here are a few ways to easily reduce truck driver stress on the job.

Get Some Sleep

The best way to reduce your stress levels is to be proactive in getting enough sleep. Without the proper amount of sleep, your body struggles to function well. One of the first things affected is your thinking. Decision making is tougher, and your attention span may shorten. All these things will lead to additional stress over the course of the day.

Great advice for any trucker: be sure to get your required hours of shut-eye to maintain a healthy mind, and reduce stress during the day.

Get the best sleep by keeping up with your bedtime routine. Reduce lights and distractions once it’s bed time. Put away your electronics before you get into bed for the night. So that once your head hits the pillow, all you need to do is close your eyes and fall asleep.

Eat to Reduce Truck Driver Stress

Stress eating is a real thing. But what about eating to reduce stress? There are plenty of foods that are known to reduce stress. Foods chock full of vitamins and minerals are known to help fuel your body and help improve your mood. Counter to this, foods without any real nutritional value can have the opposite effect.

Eating sugar or high levels of caffeine might give you a short burst of energy, but leave you dragging later. That’s certain to cause additional stress, and make your day drag even worse.

Avoid foods with short-term effects, and stick with foods that will help you stay healthy for the long haul. Keeping a good balance of foods that taste good and are good for you is a great way to keep stress at bay on the road.

Clear Your Mind with a Story

Concentrating on the road and traffic all day can take a toll on your nerves. Many drivers like to listen to podcasts or stories during the day to help pass the time. Some drivers prefer to listen once the workday is done.

After a long day on the road, many truckers find listening to audiobooks a terrific way to unwind and relax.

Once you are parked for the night, get comfortable, close your eyes, and press play. Transport yourself into a story about history, science fiction, crime dramas, or something light and happy. You can find any number of apps for your phone or tablet to play the audiobooks.

Advice from a Trucker

We asked our Drive My Way Facebook followers to let us know what helps them reduce stress.

Tim Petruccio mentioned a few different things that help him:

  • Tim Petruccio

    Tim Petruccio

    Increase following distances

    3 to 4 mph less than traffic during volume times

  • Turn off the outside noise (radio, phone calls, etc…)
  • Remember you are in control. You have the final say when it comes to YOUR safety
  • Get rest! Don’t spend 3 of your 10 hours on break, watching TV or gaming. Have a good meal, shower and then hit the rack
  • Think about the things you love (family, places, pets, etc.). Then picture yourself returning safely to them

Keeping family and friends close in your mind really can help too. It’s always good to know that no matter how tough your day is, there’s always a way to make the next day better.

Let us know what you think. Sound off on our Facebook post and let us know what you do to help reduce your truck driver stress. We’d love to share your best ideas with our readers!

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The Ultimate Guide for Truck Drivers to Maintain 3 Healthy Habits Over the Road

Download the complete guide for tips to easily maintain healthy habits over the road.
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Today’s Job of the Day is from DuBois Chemicals

DuBois Chemicals develops, manufactures, distributes and supports proprietary chemical and equipment products for a broad range of industrial and commercial applications, fulfilling mission-critical customer needs.

DuBois Chemicals is hiring Dry Van, Tanker, and Flatbed Local Drivers in Shelbyville, IN.

Drivers transport various goods from warehouse to customer’s locations using various sized power units ranging from class A to one ton flat bed and goose neck trailers.

This transporting follows DuBois policies and DOT guidelines for the safe operation of a motored unit. Following safety procedures to transport hazardous materials is a must for DuBois Target Zero safety initiative, for driver and for public safety.

Position Details:

  • An average hourly rate of $20/hour with the opportunity to earn safety bonuses
  • Runs are 75% local with some overnights, around 300 miles from Shelbyville
  • The schedule is Monday through Friday with some weekends.
  • Drivers load and unload and use a pallet jack and fork lift.

DuBois offers Medical, Dental, Vision, Life, and Disability. In addition, drivers receive PTO and 401K effective after 90 days. Hazmat, Tanker, and Doubles endorsements are required for hire.

Interested in applying?

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Today’s Job of the Day comes to us from Dupré Logistics, LLC

Dupré Logistics commits to their team members, their customers, and their community. Dupré strives to be “the ideal place to work”, and are always seeking exceptional talent to join their team of professional drivers. They invest in and reward loyalty, knowledge, performance, and a desire for growth.

Dupré Logistics is currently seeking the following CDL A drivers:

Drivers earn excellent money, receive pay weekly, and receive health benefits immediately upon hire.

In addition, Dupré offers a great benefits package which includes medical, dental, vision and prescription drug coverage, 401(k), profit sharing, short and long-term disability, company paid life insurance and much more.

Also, Dupré provides well-maintained, dedicated equipment, out and back freight, and drivers’ benefits start on day one.

Dupré Logistics asks that applicants be at least 23 years old, already have their CDL A license, and have at least two years of two years recent T/T driving experience. Positions typically require Hazmat, Tanker, or TWIC endorsements.

Interested in applying?

Learn more about the job requirements, benefits, pay and more.

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defensive driving

The best offense is a good defense⁠—and when it comes to being a safe truck driver, this old sports saying certainly holds true. Keeping you, your truck, other motorists, and your cargo safe is how truckers win on the road. There are many ways to improve your skills and reduce your risks while on the road. Here are 5 defensive driving tips for truckers everywhere.

1. Minimize distractions

Every driver needs to be connected, but not to the point where connections are distractions. Phones beeping with notifications too often, or non-critical calls coming in too frequently should be minimized. If you have something going on at home that’s distracting you, do your best to put it out of your mind until you’re done working. Many of these things are easier said than done for a truck driver with hours of time alone each day.

You don’t want to fall into bad habits while driving. So it’s smart to work on minimizing your distractions and being a safe driver.

2. Keep yourself healthy

Wearing your seat belt every day helps keep you secure in the cab of your truck. Getting enough sleep helps you pay better attention while driving. Eating right and exercising keeps you in better shape to have stamina for long days over the road. Keeping yourself safe also means you should take a break if and when you start to feel tired. Doing what you need to keep yourself in your best mental and physical condition is as important as honing and developing your driving skills and experience.

3. Expect the unexpected

Be aware of motorists around you and know your space cushion in relationship to those motorists. Anticipate what other drivers around you are going to do as they’re going to do something that could impact your driving.

Being prepared and making the correct defensive driving adjustments are key to your ability to remain safe while working.

4. Anticipate changing conditions

Truck drivers who are prepared for changing weather and road conditions will usually be better drivers. A little bit of extra care and planning when trucking through construction zones will ensure that you and the road workers make it home safely. The same goes for planning for specific times of day, especially rush hours. Anticipating construction zones, potential snow, and morning or afternoon rush hour traffic helps you be prepared for it, or better yet, helps you avoid it altogether.

5. Know your space cushion

Knowing your stopping distance is extremely important for a truck driver. A normal car can stop much quicker than a truck and it can stop within a lot less traveled distance.

According to the FMCSA, “A fully loaded truck traveling in good road conditions at highway speeds needs a distance of nearly two football fields to stop.”

That means a truck driver always needs to be aware of keeping enough space around their truck to stop quickly if demanded.

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Life is a highway… at least that’s what the song says. But for many truck drivers, that lyric couldn’t be truer. Life IS the highway for many. Truckers have countless hours alone in the cab of the truck. They can cover hundreds of miles of pavement every day. This time behind the wheel gives drivers plenty of time to spend listening to music. We asked our readers to tell us about their favorite music to listen to while driving. Here are the best truck driving songs that our Facebook followers mentioned.

Truckers and Their Tunes

There are countless “trucker” themed music compilations available for drivers. A quick Google search results in thousands of results. You can find CDs, playlists, YouTube videos, streaming channels, as well as an endless trucker-friendly podcasts.

Drive My Way Poll

Here’s what our truckers had to say when we recently polled our drivers on Facebook.

Songs that Remind them of their Families

Music can transport you to another place, just by listening to a song. The lyrics can put you in a better mood, make you feel happy or sometimes make you feel sad. Some truck driving songs can remind you of your family and friends who aren’t out driving with you.

Old School Country

Johnny Cash is always a popular selection on truckers’ radios as well as other old school country artists like the Possum himself—George Jones. A good guess would be to also find plenty of Willie and Waylon and the others from the same time. These old school country songs cover a lot of ground—just like most truck drivers. They can be about rebellion, lost loves, and there’s plenty of songs simply about having a good time.

Trucker Songs about Long Haul Driving

A classic in this conversation is East Bound and Down. The song was written for the movie Smokey and the Bandit in 1977. It’s a great song about a day in the life of a long-haul driver. “We’ve got a long way to go and a short time to get there” are perfect lyrics to sum up an over-the-road driver’s life. Hopefully without any Smokies to slow you down.

Religious Song Choices

Some drivers let us know that they fill their time on the road listening to Christian music. There are so many choices for singers and songs in this genre. Listening to Christian or other religious songs while driving can help drivers reflect and be happy while driving. There’s plenty of genres of Christian music available, from true church music, to soft rock to even Christian metal. Sometimes these spiritual or religious choices are perfect truck driving songs to get a driver through their day.

Hard Rock for the Win

Drivers mention many singers and bands that put out hard rock and metal music. These are always going to be popular choices for favorite trucker driving songs. Louder songs can help you pep up and stay alert. AC/DC, Metallica, and Five Finger Death Punch were some choices that our drivers put on their lists! The loud guitars and drums, combined with aggressive and catchy lyrics might be perfect to help a driver concentrate on the road when there’s been miles and miles of nothing to look at for hours.

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CDL B license
Considering getting a commercial driver’s license, also known as a CDL? There are 3 options when first starting: Class A CDL, Class B CDL or Class C CDL. Each type of license has its own training and testing procedures, and there are pros and cons to each. Depending on your career plans, any of these might be the right fit for you. Here we’re going to explore what you need to know when getting a Class B CDL License.

1. The basics of a Class B CDL

Though getting a Class A CDL endorsement may open up the most job opportunities for a driver, a Class B CDL licence can provide a driver with a great career. A Class B CDL is a restricted license as you are not allowed to drive large tractors that tow 10,000 pounds or more.

From the Federal Motor Carrier Association, “Any single vehicle which has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross vehicle weight of 11,794 or more kilograms (26,001 pounds or more). Or any such vehicle towing a vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating or gross vehicle weight that does not exceed  4,536 kilograms (10,000 pounds).

2. What vehicles a CDL B driver can operate

With a Class B icense, a trucker can drive any vehicles endorsed for Class B or Class C. Some of these vehicles are:

  • Straight trucks
  • Large passenger buses (city buses, tourist buses, and school buses)
  • Segmented buses
  • Box trucks (including delivery trucks and furniture trucks)
  • Dump trucks with small trailers
  • Garbage trucks / Cement mixers
  • Tractor-trailers

3. Age requirements

For a Class B CDL, the driver age requirement in some states is only 18 years or older. In these cases, this is a great opportunity for a new driver to start earlier and gain valuable experience over the road. After only 3 short years, a CDL B driver can be ready to test for the CDL A license if they’re looking to driver bigger rigs, longer distances. Please check with your local state licensing board for the most specific information for your state.

4. Where can a Class B licensed trucker drive?

If you’re a driver looking to stay closer to home, the Class B CDL might be a great option for you. Running routes locally or regionally in the Class B vehicles, can be a good option. Drivers looking to be movers, delivery drivers, bus drivers, garbage truck drivers, etc. will all need a Class B CDL.

No matter what type of license and endorsements you pursue, the key is to make sure you’re matched with the best fit trucking job for you. If you’re a newly minted CDL driver looking for your first gig, or you’ve been driving for years, let Drive My Way help you get connected with the perfect job for you.

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