Posts

Cold World Storage trucks

Today’s Job of the Day is from Cold World Storage

Cold World Storage is hiring CDL A Local and Regional/OTR Reefer/DryVan Drivers in Greensboro, NC.

Are you looking for a driving position that pays well, provides reliable equipment, and offers a friendly work environment? Look no further than Cold World Storage!

We are currently hiring company drivers to haul refrigerated loads from our Greensboro, NC terminal. We offer the perfect balance of steady work, great pay, and plenty of home time. Drivers earn competitive mileage pay, benefits, paid time off, and most weekends home.

This is a great opportunity for drivers with a solid work ethic who want to work with a successful and established trucking company – Cold World Storage is celebrating our 20th year in business.

Local Driver Compensation

  • Average weekly pay range: $1,000 – $1,200
    • Base range $19-$20 per hour
    • $300 Referral Bonus
    • Up to $200 per month in Safety/Performance Bonuses
  • Paid on the 6th and 21st of each month

Regional/OTR Driver Compensation

  • Average weekly pay range: $1,000 – $1,600
    • Base range $0.48 – $0.52 CPM with an average of 2,500 miles weekly
    • Additional Pay: stop, layover, detention
    • All miles paid
    • $300 Referral Bonus
    • Up to $200 per month in Safety/Performance Bonuses
  • Paid via direct deposit on the 6th and 21st of each month

Benefits & Perks

  • Great company benefits with Blue Cross Blue Shield starting after 90 days:
    • Medical, Prescription, Dental, and Vision Insurance
    • $25,000 Life Insurance Policy (paid for by company with additional coverage available for purchase by employee)
    • Disability Insurance (LTD paid for by company; STD available for purchase by employee)
    • Paid Company Holidays
    • Paid Time Off
  • Perks: fuel cards provided
  • For Regional/OTR Drivers:
    • Companion rider policy
    • Take your truck home program
    • No Slip Seating

Home Time, Routes & Schedule

  • Home Time:
    • Local Drivers: Home Daily
    • Regional/OTR Drivers: Mostly every weekend with some exceptions
  • Schedule: Monday through Friday. Weekend work optional
  • Level of Touch: No Touch Freight, bumping docks only.

Equipment

  • Various model trucks are available (some pre gliders) – 2005 and later
  • Automatic or manual with amenities for Regional/OTR drivers (fridge, mattress, etc.)
  • Governed speed: 72 mph
  • Forward-facing cameras

Qualifications for Company Drivers and Owner Operators

  • Must be at least 21 years of age
  • Drivers must have CDL A license
  • Must have a minimum of 2 years verifiable tractor-trailer driving experience with a clean driving record (no points).
  • No DUI/DWIs in last 5 years
  • Must meet Department of Transportation (DOT) testing and physical requirements and be knowledgeable of DOT regulations
  • Must be able to pass a required pre-employment drug screen
  • Local drivers must live within 40 miles of Greensboro
  • Regional/OTR drivers must live within NC, SC, VA, TN, or OH

Join the Cold World Storage Team!

Cold World Storage is hiring CDL A Local and Regional/OTR Reefer/DryVan Drivers in Greensboro, NC. Drivers enjoy competitive pay and great benefits!

Local Drivers  Regional Drivers

vine line trucking

Today’s Job of the Day comes from Vine Line Logistics

Vine Line Logistics is A Higher Calling —Eat Better and Live Healthier!

Vine Line Trucking is currently recruiting for a motivated individual to join our team as full-time CDL A Local Refrigerated Driver. Qualified candidates will have an excellent work ethic, solid attendance record, and a safe driving history. The driver must follow all local, state, federal, and transportation regulations.

Our people are the secret ingredients that make Vine Line Trucking’s promise for delivering healthier fresh foods a reality every day. Our people embrace change and thrive in a dynamic environment that’s shaped by Mother Nature. With an eye toward the future, our team never rests on yesterday’s accomplishments. If you’re passionate about contributing to a healthier lifestyle and are inspired by a challenging environment, contact us, and discover the impact you can make!

Vine Line Logistics is hiring a CDL A Local Refrigerated Driver in Comstock Park, MI.

Compensation:

  • Average annual pay: $35,360
    • $17.00 Per Hour
    • Referral bonus: $700
  • Paid via direct deposit weekly

Benefits & Perks

  • Great company benefits starting on 1st of the month following 60 days.
    • Medical, Dental and Vision Insurance
  • Life Insurance – $50,000
  • Disability Insurance
  • Paid training and paid orientation
  • 401K with 4% company match
  • Paid Company Holidays
  • Paid Time Off

Home Time, Routes, & Schedule

  • Home Daily
  • Weekend work required regularly with overtime
  • Route: 200 miles around Comstock Park
  • Level of Touch: Load & Unload

Equipment

  • Box truck or Class A 53 foot tractor-trailer
  • Automatic or manual
  • Governed speed: 70 mph

Qualifications

  • Must be at least 18 years of age
  • CDL A license required
  • Must have a minimum of 2 years verifiable tractor-trailer driving experience with a clean driving record
  • MVR and criminal history will be evaluated.
  • Must meet Department of Transportation (DOT) testing and physical requirements and be knowledgeable of DOT regulations
  • Drivers must be able to pass a required pre-employment drug screen
  • Must be able to lift 50 lbs.
  • Hiring Radius: Drivers must live within 35 miles of Comstock Park or be willing to relocate for this position. 

Vine Line Logistics

Interested in applying?

Vine Line Logistics is hiring a CDL A Local Refrigerated Driver in Comstock Park, MI.  Learn more about the job requirements, benefits, pay and more. Join the Vine Line Logistics team!

Local Reefer Driver

type of freight

When deciding what type of freight is best for you, there’s a lot to think about. As a driver, you’re probably looking for good pay, home time, and job availability. Seems simple, but there’s a lot that can go into that decision. Not all types of trucking are for everyone. Choose something that meets your needs and is a good fit for your lifestyle. Otherwise, you’re going to be looking for a new job all over again all too soon. When you think about the type of freight you want to haul, these are a few things to help make your decision.

Making the Right Decision

Your Lifestyle

One of the most important things to consider when you are trying to decide on a type of freight is your lifestyle. Choose a job that fits YOU. That includes pay. If a job doesn’t pay well enough to support you and your family, you probably won’t stay very long. Home time is another “must-have” for most drivers. Some drivers are die-hard OTR fans and like nothing better than weeks on the road. Other drivers need home time every night to tuck their kids into bed. 

There are jobs out there for every type of trucker, so decide what works best for you, and look for jobs that meet your bottom line expectations.

The final lifestyle question has to do with how you spend your time on the job. Do you want to be driving most of the time or have a variety of non-driving related tasks mixed in? There are jobs out there for every type of trucker, so decide what works best for you.

Company Type

Once you make some big decisions about lifestyle and narrow down your list, consider company type. Do you want to work for a large carrier or a small carrier? Small carriers are more likely to give you that “family feel,” but freight may be less consistent depending on their specialty. On the other hand, large companies usually have higher freight volumes, but you might not feel as personally connected to your team.

Along with company size, consider haul type. Would you prefer a company that always carries the same thing or do you like a little variety in your life? Similarly, do you want to always work with the same customers? Consider looking for a dedicated route. Also, there are some local routes where you can get to know your customers the same way. 

Experience and Endorsements

At the end of the day, there’s a job for every driver, but not every driver is a good fit for every job. Experience and endorsements are two big deciding factors. Some jobs typically go to drivers with more experience. For example, most drivers who haul over-dimensional loads have at least 10 years of experience under their belt. 

Endorsements can also make a big difference. Some jobs “require” specific endorsements while others “prefer” them. Endorsements verify your training in a specific area, but they are also a sign to the employer that you were willing to invest in yourself to take on new responsibilities. If you identify a type of freight that is a great fit for you, find out if you have the right endorsements. If not, consider whether it’s worth getting additional training right now. 

A few of the most common endorsements for CDL A and CDL B drivers are:

Types of Freight to Consider 

1. Dry Van

dry van truckMany truck drivers start out learning to drive Dry Van. Dry Van drivers usually carry dry goods and a wide variety of non-perishable freight in 53’ trailers. Many Dry Van positions are over the road or regional. Drivers who want to drive Dry Van will have a wide range of companies to choose from. With so many companies to choose from, read job descriptions carefully to make sure the job fits your pay and home time needs.

Endorsements: Many Dry Van positions do not require endorsements, but some specialized loads may require Hazmat or Doubles and Triples endorsements.

Lifestyle Fit: Hauling Dry Van is a popular choice for many drivers. It’s great for new drivers because there aren’t as many special considerations as for some other types of freight. Many experienced drivers stick with Dry Van for similar reasonsthere’s often lots of variety in the type of freight drivers haul and it has a refreshing level of simplicity.

2. Refrigerated Freight

refrigerated truck driverRefrigerated trucking, more commonly known as Reefer trucking, is particularly good for drivers who have some experience already and pride themselves on their close attention to detail. Reefer drivers most commonly haul food, which gives drivers a lot of job security. If you are a Refrigerated Freight owner operator and do have a hard time getting a load, you can also haul Dry Van freight in a Reefer truck. 

Endorsements: Most Reefer positions do not require endorsements. 

Lifestyle Fit: Reefer trucking is hard work but is also compensated well. Most people consider hauling refrigerated freight after they have a few years of experience and are looking to diversify. Most of these jobs are regional or OTR, and you will have a lot of companies to choose from. Reefer drivers tend to work odd hours and will find themselves regularly loading and driving during nighttime hours.

3. Flatbed

oversized flatbed loadFlatbed drivers are in high demand and, as a result, pay is typically more competitive than some other driving jobs. Unlike Dry Van or Reefer jobs, Flatbed jobs often require more physical work to safely secure the loads with tarps. Some flatbed drivers will have a Conestoga trailer with a sliding tarp system instead of a traditional flatbed trailer. That often makes loading, unloading, and securing much more convenient for the driver. 

Endorsements: Typically, Flatbed drivers do not need additional endorsements

Lifestyle Fit: Flatbed trucking is often considered one of the more challenging types of trucking jobs. If you don’t mind a little extra physical work and are up for an adventure, the higher pay and regular job demand make Flatbed a great choice for many drivers.

4. Tanker

tanker trucks getting filledDriving a Tanker truck can mean hauling either liquids or dry bulk. If you see a Tanker truck position available, it could be for anything from gasoline or water (liquids) to food or materials like sand (Dry bulk). Often, Tanker truck drivers have a few years of experience, and as the name says, you’ll need your Tanker endorsement. 

Endorsements: Tanker endorsement required. For some jobs, you will also need a Hazmat endorsement to haul hazardous materials. 

Lifestyle Fit: Tanker drivers earn a good wage and usually have strong benefits. In addition, many Tanker jobs are regional or local, so drivers are home frequently. Unlike Dry Van and Reefer, loading and unloading a Tanker can go quickly. You could be in and out in under 20 minutes! Drivers wear protective gear to reduce that risk during the loading and unloading process. 

5. Specialty Loads

If you want to haul a specific type of freight, chances are someone will pay you to do it. In addition to the more common haul types we mentioned earlier, there are many types of specialty loads out there. Here are just a few examples:

  • Over-Dimensional Loads: Anything bigger than typical dimensions. Usually, drivers need to have some flatbed experience first.
  • Autohauler: These drivers haul cars. It’s highly specialized and valuable freight, so drivers need a lot of skill and are paid well. 
  • Intermodal: Any freight that uses at least two types of transportation is intermodal freight (ex. Train and truck). Most drivers work close to a railroad or shipping hub.
  • Livestock: Frequently Livestock drivers usually haul chickens, pigs, horses, or cows. Drivers need a certification for the specific type of livestock they haul. It’s hard work, and drivers are compensated well for their extra efforts.

find-cdl-truck-driver-jobs

Find a CDL Driving Job

We match you with a job based on your personal preferences and qualifications.

Find a Job Today

refrigerated truck driver

Are you looking to expand your trucking experience? Being a refrigerated truck driver might be the perfect fit. It’s most commonly known as reefer trucking, and this haul type is particularly good for drivers who have some experience already and pride themselves on their close attention to detail. Reefer trucking is hard work but is also compensated well. Here are a few ways to decide whether being a refrigerated truck driver is for you. 

Job Security is a High Priority

Job security is one of those things that is hard to measure when you are job searching but helps us all sleep a little better at night. This year, job security has been top of mind for many Americans. As we saw in Spring 2020, many truck drivers were considered essential workers, but not all of them. One big benefit of being a refrigerated truck driver is that your job security is very good. Reefer trucks primarily carry fresh food. As a result, no matter what else happens, reefer trucks will be on the roads. 

Job security is very good for reefer drivers. Most refrigerated truck drivers haul fresh food, and that will always be essential.

Demand for reefer trucking is consistently moderate to high because of the goods hauled. On the other hand, because of the extra training requirements, the supply of drivers is comparatively low. If you are a refrigerated truck driver or want to become one, that means less job competition for you! Many (but not all) reefer drivers are owner-operators. If you are finding your own loads, reefer trucks are a more flexible choice. Even if you can’t get a refrigerated load, some dry van loads can also be hauled in a reefer truck. That helps reduce the possibility of an empty return trip where you’re not earning a paycheck.

You Want to Diversify Your Experience

Being a refrigerated truck driver isn’t a first step for most CDL holders. Running refrigerated loads can be challenging, but it’s also well-paid. Typically, people start considering reefer driving after at least a few years of other driving experience. To become a refrigerated truck driver, you will need some extra training. 

In addition to the technical skills you will learn, refrigerated truck drivers need to be excellent decision-makers and problem solvers. Because of the temperature control required for successful reefer runs, a breakdown can mean losing a load. So, drivers must have quick, sound judgment when they run into unexpected challenges on the road. Once you have a few years of experience under your belt, reefer driving is a great way to stand out as a skilled candidate for future jobs. 

Employers Consider You Punctual and Detail-Oriented

Being a refrigerated truck driver takes more than just good driving. Arriving on time for deliveries is extremely important. Often, a missed appointment isn’t just a question of a slight delay. It can mean a very long wait time (even up to more than a day!) before you can reschedule your delivery! With that in mind, punctuality is critical for anyone hauling a reefer trailer. 

Punctuality is critical for anyone hauling a reefer trailer. Schedules can be very tight and most loads have very specific requirements for temperature.

In a refrigerated truck, precision doesn’t stop at the schedule. Most loads have very specific requirements for temperature. To help manage this, drivers may be responsible for supervising the loading and position of freight in their trailer. Depending on the job, drivers may also be responsible for loading or unloading as well. Then, after you’re on the road, drivers must use consistent tracking to maintain a certain temperature in all parts of the trailer at all times.

9-5 Jobs Aren’t Your Style

Truck driving is more than a job. For many drivers, it’s a lifestyle. Each haul type has unique pros and cons, and refrigerated loads are no exception. These runs are a good fit for night owl drivers who love the quiet roads in the early morning hours. Reefer drivers tend to work odd hours and will find themselves regularly loading and driving during nighttime hours. 

Reefer jobs can be local, regional, or OTR. Many local drivers are home every night, but regional and OTR drivers will be spending nights in the cab. In a refrigerated truck, the cooling unit has to run 24/7, and that comes with a lot of noise. For light sleepers, earplugs may be a worthwhile investment.

It’s Time to Be Your Own Boss

Refrigerated trucking owner-operators are in high demand. It is also possible to be a refrigerated truck driver for a large carrier, but these positions are harder to come by.

If you are interested in becoming an owner-operator, being a refrigerated truck driver might be a perfect fit for you. 

As with any owner-operator position, confidence navigating hiring contracts is a must. Because the stakes for breakdowns or repairs can be a lost load, owner-operators need to understand their contract inside and out. A contract should clearly state who is responsible for the cost of repairs and maintenance. Once you understand the finances, logistics, and contracts of being an independent contractor, you’re ready to be your own boss!

find-cdl-truck-driver-jobs

Want to find a Reefer driving job you love?

Drive My Way matches drivers with jobs based on their qualifications and lifestyle preferences.

Find a Job Today

conare

Today’s Job of the Day comes from Conare

Conare Inc. has been in the trucking industry for 17 years. We pride ourselves on taking care of our employees and having an open-door policy. You must be a dependable and safety-minded professional, with a commitment to providing our customers with the best possible service. For exceptional drivers, there’s room for raises and easily obtainable $300-$350 total monthly bonuses. Also, we’re the only ones that pay $45-$50 a week for drop and hook. We’re expanding our team and looking for CDL A Doubles Team Drivers for a dedicated run from Salt Lake City, UT to areas with Nebraska.

Prefer to hire within a 150 mile radius of Salt Lake.

Compensation, Benefits, and Other Perks:

  • Company Driver – Team Job (will accept solo drivers willing to team)
  • Direct Deposit – Paid weekly: Team rate will start at 60 Cents per team
  • Employment Type: Full-time, W2
  • Benefits: Health insurance – Redirect Health – Can start within the first month
  • Orientation – Will accommodate and pay for flight or bus fare
  • Monthly safety bonuses and will pay-out for drop and hook weekly

Schedule & Home Time:

  • Type of Run: OTR – Dedicated (Salt Lake City, UT to areas with Nebraska)
  • Driving an average of 4,600-5,000 miles per week
  • No touch freight
  • Haul Type: Dry Van
  • Out 5 days home 2
  • Have yard on FedEx ground to park personal vehicles and our trucks

Equipment:

  • 2019/2020 Freightliner Cascadia ALL NEW EQUIPMENT
  • FedEx trailers
  • Safety features include: blind spot detection, Lane departure, Collision warning.
  • Amenities include: fridge, closet. Can bring own Microwaves.

Qualifications:

  • License: CDL A
  • Minimum Age: 23
  • Minimum Experience: 2 years
  • Endorsements Required: Doubles
  • Must pass all DOT Requirements, Physical Exam, and Drug Test
  • Good MVR and safe driving record
  • 2 years dry van experience
  • OTR Experience: 18 months or two winters in the last 4 year

Interested in applying?

Learn more about the job requirements, benefits, pay and more.

Learn More and Apply

A2B Cargo

Today’s job of the day comes from A2B Cargo

A2B Cargo is an asset-based, family-owned trucking company based in Markham, IL. They operate in all 48 states, hauling both Refrigerated and Dry Van freight. Their company experienced amazing growth over the last several years, but they work hard to maintain a small company atmosphere.

You need to know A2B Cargo. Why? Because their company truck driving opportunities take your earning potential the extra mile. True OTR professionals can earn up to $80,000 in just their first year at A2B, and the longer you stay, the more you get paid.

Currently, A2B Cargo is hiring Dry Van and Reefer Company Drivers and Owner Operators throughout the Midwest, North, and South East.

CDL A Company Truck Driver Qualifications:

  • Must possess valid CDL-A
  • Must have 2 years of recent verifiable driving experience
  • Must be 25 years of age or older

CDL A Owner Operator Truck Driver Qualifications:

  • Must possess valid CDL-A
  • Must have 2 years of recent verifiable driving experience
  • Must be 25 years of age or older

Interested in applying?

Learn more about the job requirements, benefits, pay and more.

Company Drivers Owner Operators

overdriveonline.comWith new regulations for food haulers handed down in April by the FDA, shippers will now be charged with setting cleanliness guidelines for truck drivers and their equipment, Overdrive writes. One attorney says shippers may turn trucks away without loads if they fail to meet previously agreed to requirements.

Rob Moseley of transportation firm Smith Moore Leatherwood offered insight into the new regulations in a May 11 webinar held for shippers, brokers and carriers.

The Food & Drug Administration rules remain broad, and only about 10% of the rule applies to food transportation. Even then, most of the transportation-focused portions of the rule, meant for shippers. So, just a small part of the rule applies to carriers directly.

The new rules goes into effect April 6, 2017.

They require shippers to develop standards for certain food shipments, such as temperature-controlled foods and produce.

“Shippers control the process without any question about it,” Moseley said. “They control how to transport their goods. And the consignee or receiver tasked with making sure those protocols set by the shipper have been met.”

Shippers must set sanitation requirements for carriers’ equipment.

In addition, they also set pre-cooling requirements for reefer loads and periodic training for carrier personnel, drivers included, who may interact with food products.

Likely the key takeaway from the new regulations for food hauling carriers is to have clean, well kept equipment, Moseley said. “This may mean that trailers need work,” he said. “If they leak with rain from the roof, or if road water comes into the trailer from the floor, you need to make changes,” he said. Small holes, debris, vermon droppings or trailers that smell bad give shippers pause under the new rules, Moseley said.

Another component of the rule likely to apply to carriers are its pre-cooling requirements.

Such requirements impact by load times. When shippers dictate certain pre-cooling temperatures prior to food being loaded onto a trailer, those requirements must be met, Moseley said. Long waiting times at a dock compromises pre-cooling. Then, shippers start checking for proper pre-cooling temperatures due to the new FDA regulations.

find-cdl-truck-driver-jobs

Want to find a job you love?

Drive My Way matches drivers with jobs based on their qualifications and lifestyle preferences.

Find Better Today