How to Find the Best Trucking Jobs for YouFinding a new trucking job usually isn’t too tough for a good driver. But finding the perfect fit trucking jobs for any driver can take a little bit more effort. There’s plenty of job boards, and social media postings out there for drivers to sift through. As well as the seemingly endless emails and phone calls truck drivers get daily. It can turn into information overload, with no real path to the right answer. With all of the information out there, here’s 4 ways to find the best trucking jobs for you.

1. Know what you want

“Job prospects are projected to be very good for heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers with the proper training and a clean driving record.” —Bureau of Labor Statistics

If you’ve just started looking into being a driver, or if you’ve been trucking for 20+ years, you need to know what type of job is the best trucking job for you right now. As time passes, things change, and your personal and professional needs change too. A new driver might be all about logging miles and making money. A more seasoned driver might be needing a change to be closer to home most of the time. In any case, be sure to keep a log of all the things that must be a part of your next job. As well as all of the things that you’d never want to do again.

Once you’ve got that list of preferences dialed-in, be sure to be clear in your conversations, or in your electronic profiles, of exactly what you want. And then don’t settle for less than that!

2. Do your homework

Truckers subscribe to various podcasts, video channels and social media outlets that provide content about all things in a truckers life. Use these channels to help you research your next job. Find out who pays well and who doesn’t. Listen to other drivers when they talk about benefits and how well they’re treated by their company. Follow the blogs and newsletter that give you data about retention and longevity with a company. The right opportunity is there for you to find the best trucking jobs for your next move.

3. Pay attention at truck stops

A quick stop and a stroll through the parking lot at a truck stop can be an opportunity to learn a lot. Talking with other drivers, checking out carriers’ equipment, and otherwise being immersed in “what’s out there”, can be a great way to find the next place you want to work. Or conversely, the places you should avoid.

Old equipment that needs a lot of work or listening to drivers complain about their working conditions give you all you need to know about where the wrong jobs might be. Take note, and be sure to avoid their calls and emails.

4. Create a profile with Drive My Way

One great way to do make sure you don’t miss a great match is to keep your profile and preference current on DriveMyWay.com. Once logged in, you can keep your changing preferences about types of driving, how much time away from home and other personal preferences up-to-date. So when a perfect fit job gets listed, you can be the first to know. If you haven’t yet filled out a profile, you can get started here. It’s fast and is a great first step to changing the way you look for your next trucking gig.

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halloween safety tips

It’s that time of year again when ghosts, goblins, witches, and superheroes roam the streets in search of candy. As trick-or-treaters scour for goodies around neighborhoods, truck drivers need to practice extra caution while on the job. The trucking profession always requires drivers to remember the public’s safety. Halloween can be even trickier since there will be more children and parents near the road. Here are 4 Halloween safety tips for truck drivers.

1. Avoid certain areas

There are certain places which truck drivers should try to avoid during this spooky season. Avoid roads that make you pass by schools and parks. Same goes for any area where there may be events and Halloween festivities taking place. Trucks don’t usually need to pass through small streets and neighborhoods, but this would be a time to really avoid them. Be sure to drive slower and be extra vigilant if some of these places cannot be avoided.

2. Keep watchful

While you can try to avoid certain areas, sometimes trick-or-treaters will spill over to other places. There might be more parents, cars, and children in unexpected locations. Truck drivers need to remain watchful and vigilant for children who may dart out into the street.

Be particularly careful around crosswalks, intersections, and the sides of the road.

If you see one child, there are likely more close-by. Don’t assume that parents or adults will always be accompanying their kids around the area.

3. Don’t get distracted

While truck drivers usually are mindful about not being distracted behind the wheel, everyone slips up now and again. You may have gained a certain degree of comfort with being slightly distracted because nothing has gone wrong yet.

Don’t let that confidence make you too comfortable- Halloween is definitely not the day to get distracted!

Don’t use your mobile device while behind the wheel or get distracted by a snack or drink. Remember that a split second not paying attention to the road can make all the difference for a child who decided to sprint across the street without looking.

4. Driving tips

While most of the Halloween safety tips involve being careful around the behavior of others, there are some driving tips you can follow yourself. Always use your turn signal on this day to indicate your intentions to others. Along with neighborhoods and small streets, make sure to drive slow around driveways and intersections. Don’t pass vehicles that have stopped in the road since they may be dropping off children. Try to avoid reversing entirely, since you won’t get a complete look if anyone is behind you.

With these Halloween safety tips in mind, you’ll be all set for safe driving this spooky season!

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Tips for Women Truck DriversBeing a woman driver in the male-dominated trucking industry comes with a unique set of challenges. Driving provides women truckers with many of the same advantages as it does to men—independence, flexibility, and the opportunity to travel across the country.

But the obstacles don’t affect men and women truckers equally. Women truck drivers have to think about the job, safety, and hygiene differently. While the industry is starting to change to become more friendly toward women, there’s still much work to be done. Until then, here are 7 tips for women truck drivers.

work life balance women truck drivers1. Work-life balance

While work-life balance should be important for all truckers, it’s sometimes not as important to men. Carriers may become used to offering insufficient home time and opportunities for balance simply because men aren’t as vocal about these concerns as women. Women truck drivers may find themselves on the short end of the stick simply because their male counterparts aren’t asking for more!

We spoke to Heather, a truck driver with 2 years of experience. She said, “I did OTR just long enough to get a little experience to find a local job. I have 3 boys so I wanted to be local as soon as possible. Was a VERY LONG 7 months, and I learned everything in the winter months in the snow and ice.”

Communication with your fleet manager or leader is essential to ensuring that you get the work-life balance you deserve. In fact, women drivers shouldn’t be waiting that long to start discussions around home time. Communicating with recruiters that this is a priority for you will set you on the right path to achieving the kind of balanced lifestyle you’re looking for.

2. Safety in your truck

The trucking industry can be tough on women for reasons of safety simply because they are on the road. There’s no predicting what kinds of characters you can run into across the country and in truck stops. Solo drivers may feel particularly uncomfortable if shady characters become aware that they are driving alone.

We spoke to Michele, a truck driver with a few months of experience so far in the industry. She suggests that solo drivers keep their bunk curtains closed at all times. “Let people think there [is] someone sleeping in the back even while you’re driving,” she advises.

Michele also notes that placing a team driving sticker on your truck will also create the impression that you are not traveling alone, and she highly recommends this trick to other women drivers.

truck stop safety tips3. Safety at a truck stop

Truck stops are notorious for being minefields for women truck drivers. Although many truck stops are taking measures to improve conditions and become more woman-friendly, they can’t control the behavior of the characters who lurk around.

We encourage women to know precautions to take to stay safe at truck stops.

Heather said, “When walking through the truck stop at night, have something handy in case you need to protect yourself.”

Although violence at truck stops is rare, there are always safety precautions people can take.

4. Behind the wheel

Some of the women truck drivers we spoke to had specific advice about staying behind the wheel. Road conditions can become dangerous during nighttime or the winter season.

Michele recommends that women truck drivers pre-plan and keep checking their routes, especially in the winter. She states, “Just because it was open 2 hours ago, doesn’t mean it’s open later.”

Heather listens to forensic files and chews gum to help keep her awake during night driving. She encourages women drivers to pull over if needed and states, “If road conditions become too treacherous, just stop! Freight can wait!”

5. Hygiene

Women truck drivers will have specific concerns about hygiene that male drivers won’t. And unfortunately, sometimes male drivers, fleet managers, or truck stop employees may be unaware or unsympathetic to these issues.

Heather said that one of the biggest lessons she learned from her OTR driving days is to always have baby wipes handy. She also recommends to “keep an empty big gulp cup because they are the easiest to pee into.”

Hopefully it doesn’t come to that, but with OTR driving, the stops can be few and far between, so it’s better to be prepared in the case of emergencies!

women truck drivers6. Reach out to other women drivers

While it may seem easy to understand the concerns of women drivers, or imagine what the job will be like, there’s no way to know until someone has done it. We recommend completing some research about what to expect, but there’s no substitute for speaking with other women truck drivers who’ve been there themselves.

Reaching out to other women truck drivers will give you an inside look at what issues they’ve been facing and how they’ve handled them. As you speak to more women drivers, you’ll build a network of colleagues who have each others’ back and can work together. You may also want to connect with organizations like Women in Trucking, which focus on addressing these obstacles.

7. Find the right carrier

While women drivers can take certain measures themselves, they can’t do it all alone. It takes a community that values women’s issues and concerns in the trucking industry.

Before signing with your next carrier, do some research and find out which carriers value their women drivers.

Some carriers will do more to promote career opportunities, improve conditions, and deliver resources needed to address women’s issues in trucking. A company’s culture can have a large impact on a woman truck driver’s sense of belonging, identity, and purpose. Finding a carrier that aligns with your own values will help you feel comfortable and secure in a male-dominated industry.

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truck driver depression

Truck drivers spend a significant time away from home. They might not have much quality time with family and friends for long stretches of time. Truckers might spend most of their day without actually talking to anyone face-to-face. Compound this with an extremely high-stress job, and it’s probably not too difficult for a trucker to develop some feelings of loneliness and anxiety. If those feelings don’t get addressed properly, true depression can soon follow. Here are 3 ways to overcome truck driver depression.

What is Depression?

Almost everyone has days when they’re just not feeling 100% happy. Or maybe a mild stretch of feeling sad over something. But actual depression is different. It’s when these feeling last more than a few weeks. And the symptoms cause physical changes to a person’s everyday life. Symptoms can range from mild things like loss of sleep, mood swings, or lack of energy. Sometimes symptoms can be more severe, and result in someone not able to get out of bed or leave their house for days. Truck driver depression rates are almost 2 times that of the general population..

More than 17 million U.S. adults—over 7% of the population—had at least one major depressive episode in the past year.  – National Alliance on Mental Illness

Tip 1: Recognize and React

Be receptive to your own thoughts and feelings. Also be accepting of others asking you if you’re doing ok. Once you’re aware that there’s an issue, you can work to make changes to help address it. Truck drivers usually have time in the evenings to do their research. Take that alone time and flip it from a negative to a positive. Listen to a good mental health podcast. Start to put together plans to begin to feel better, and stay ahead of things should symptoms arise again the future.

Tip 2: Don’t Make Things Worse

Rather than dealing with any type of problem, some people think that things will just get better or try to fix it themselves. Or some people prefer to not seek help when they don’t feel great, and just hope things go away. With depression, it’s not always just that easy. Thinking this way often leads people to try and mask systems by abusing alcohol or drugs. Or taking out anger and frustrations on friends or loved ones. Truck drivers already have a high rate of drug/alcohol abuse. Seek help as soon as you recognize symptoms. This is something that’s not just going to go away on it’s own if left untreated.

Tip 3: Plan to Stay Healthy

Once truck driver depression is being treated, it’s time to start planning ahead to make sure they stay healthy. There’s plenty of resources out there that help find ways to reduce stress. There’s plenty of ways to stay in touch with your family and friends while away from home. And lastly, there’s plenty of ways to keep your mind and body in shape with a good diet and plenty of exercise out on the road.

Changing Times

The stigma associated with mental disorders and illness continue to decrease. People with depression issues no longer need to hide in the shadows alone. There are more support organizations and resources available than there ever have been. Some trucking companies even offer mental health benefits and resources specifically to their drivers. Truck driver depression is something that can be identified, treated and overcome when the driver connects with the right resources.

If you or someone you know are struggling with depression, and need someone to talk to, please seek help. If you can’t get in touch with your doctor. a great place to seek help is through the National Alliance on Mental Illness. The NAMI HelpLine can be reached Monday through Friday, 10 am–6 pm, ET. 1-800-950-NAMI (6264) or info@nami.org.

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The Ultimate Guide for Truck Drivers to Maintain 3 Healthy Habits Over the Road

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plant based dietFollowing a plant-based diet has become a well-accepted, and effective way to get healthier. These types of eating plans are especially good for those looking to improve their heart health due to drastically reducing saturated fats and cholesterol. For truckers, life on the road can make it difficult to follow this strict way of eating. Especially when not at home every day to prepare meals. But with a little planning and some kitchen basics, it is possible. Here are some ideas for truck drivers looking to master a plant-based diet over the road.

The Plant-Based Basics

Eating plant-based means that most, or even all, calories come from plants. This includes fruits, vegetables, grains and nuts. Plant-based does not necessarily equal becoming a vegan. For most, eating plant-based means cutting back on meat & dairy overall, but not eliminating them 100%. Some people choose to ease into this way of life by cutting back little by little, each day. Or perhaps eating only vegetarian one or 2 days per week. The Meatless Monday trend came about just for that reason! And that’s a great place for those looking to find a way to change their diets slowly.

Not Every Plant-Based Diet Is Created Equal

If you’ve made the decision to start following a plant-based diet, there’s a few different ways to do it.

Swapping out meat and dairy for healthy vegetables and nut milks, can bring about weight loss and better heart health. But swapping out meat and dairy for a diet laden heavy with potatoes, rice and increased grains might actually lead to weight gain, even though it’s actually plant-based.

Researching all of the variations of this way of eating and working with your doctor to help you choose a plan is recommended before starting any new diets.

Heart Health

A plant-based diet is the only diet that has been shown to not only prevent—but to reverse—advanced-stage cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes says Julieanna Hever, California-based nutritionist, founder of Plant-Based Dietitian and author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Plant-Based Nutrition.

On the Go

Meal-prepping before your trips is key to keeping on track with a plant-based diet. Having a plentiful supply of clean and ready fruits and vegetables handy for snacks is a great start. That can also make things easier when cooking meals for the workweek. There are great recipes for vegetarian soups, stews, and casseroles. And for those days when it might be tough to find a healthy dinner and you don’t have anything prepped it’s good to have a backup plan. Plant-based protein powders or protein bars are great options when in a pinch.

There are ways to eat a plant-based diet at fast food restaurants as well. Besides focusing only on salad bars, many restaurants are catering to those looking for more meat and dairy-less options. There are some great resources available that can help make good fast-food choices when on the road.

Try a plant-based diet to get heart-healthy while over the road. Let us know your thoughts in the comments below or on our Facebook page. We’d love to share your great ideas with our our trucker family online.

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The Ultimate Guide for Truck Drivers to Maintain 3 Healthy Habits Over the Road

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owner operator

Becoming an owner operator is even more challenging than it sounds. While many company drivers aspire to become owner operators, it’s not meant for everyone. Becoming your own boss in trucking will give you more independence and flexibility but comes with new responsibilities. Generally, you’ll want to consider being an owner operator only after years of experience on the road as a company driver. Even those who would make good owner operators aren’t ready until they’ve invested a great deal in the trucking industry. Here are 5 signs that you’re ready to become an owner operator.

1. Enough experience

Experience is the biggest factor you’ll need to take into consideration before becoming an owner operator. How many years have you spent as a company driver? For how many carriers? There are many things you need to take into consideration before being sure that you’re ready to be an owner operator. Experience gives you familiarity with not just driving, but with the industry and the lifestyle. If you know the ins and outs of the industry, it’s a good sign you’re ready to become an owner operator. Don’t forget the lifestyle. If you’re not a big fan of the long hours on the road and the time away from home, being an owner operator may not be for you. If you’ve adapted to the advantages of the lifestyle, along with the challenges it brings, then it’s a good sign you’re ready to become an owner operator. 

2. Financially prepared

Being financially prepared is another important factor before making your decision. Make no mistake about it, starting your own operation requires you to have access to cash, and lots of it. You’ll need strong credit to take out the loans needed or dig into your savings to finance your operation. The biggest expense, of course, is the equipment. Making a large down payment on your truck will keep your equipment payments lower. You’ll also need cash for insurance, meals, maintenance and repair, or other expenses. You’ll have to ask yourself if you’re willing to risk losing everything.

If you’re successful, you could be making over $100,000, but many more owner operators will be struggling before they start making a profit.

You should have a backup financial plan in case things turn south. It helps to have a solid understanding of your finances, so you know how much you need to make in order to break even or turn a profit. Its important to set a budget for your own personal expenses and for expected business costs. Your health, family’s expenses, kids’ tuition costs, and retirement plans should all factor into this. Talk to a reliable and trustworthy financial adviser before starting as an owner operator. Being in a strong financial position is a good sign that you’re ready to become an owner operator.

3. Personal life

Having experience and money isn’t enough for being an owner operator. You need to make sure the decision is the right one for your personal and home life. The lifestyle can be all-consuming so most owner operators have either a very stable relationship that can survive the distance, or no current relationship. Many owner operators are out on the road for longer stretches of time than company drivers. The trade-off is that you may have more days at home with family before the next job takes you out again. You’ll have to decide if that benefit is worth it. Some drivers forget that even if they’re home for longer periods of time, they’ll be working more hours at home simply to take care of the business side.

The added responsibility of running your own business may take a toll on family life.

You’ll also need to consider health as a factor. If you have serious health issues right now, it could be an impediment toward becoming an owner operator. It’ll be difficult to run the business and drive for long runs if you’re expecting to be receiving constant treatment or paying medical bills. There are always chances that unexpected health issues may arise in the future. However, you should plan around any known health conditions. Being in good health without any expected illnesses is a good sign you’re ready to become an owner operator.

4. Business preparedness

If you’ve taken the time to become business savvy, it’s a good sign you’re ready to become an owner operator.

The independence of being your own boss comes with the responsibility of running your own business, but not every driver is ready for it.

Regulations, compliance, cost per mile, gross revenue, maintenance costs, tax filing and accounting are only a few of the various aspects of a job. You’ll also need to create a basic budget and a medium-term business plan. How many jobs will you take per month? How long will you run your own operation and what will you do afterwards? Some preparation on these matters makes you ready to become an owner operator.

Take some time to research about the basic of finance and accounting. The trucking industry is also heavily regulated. As an owner operator, you’ll need to be aware of all the regulations ahead of time, and make sure you are in compliance. Some drivers speak to legal and business advisers before making important decisions and to learn more about the risks involved. A trucker who has been a company driver for a few years and hasn’t learned much about the business or legal side will likely not thrive as an owner operator.

5. Networking, research, and more networking

Being an owner operator means finding your own jobs and companies to partner with. You’ll need to investigate which companies are honest and trustworthy many months and even years before you get started. Familiarity with the companies is helpful but nothing beats partnering with a good carrier you’ve already driven for as a company driver. When you can’t work with the same company, its essential to speak with other owner operators to find out what they’re saying. What’s their take on the best companies? Which companies should be avoided? Keeping your pulse on the current situation will make you the most prepared before deciding who to partner with.

Look for carriers with owner operators who have been with them for a long time.

Becoming an owner operator is the holy grail of trucking. Sometimes it may seem like an inevitable place to reach since many drivers consider it and some actually pull it off successfully. Still, the added benefits come with new responsibilities which not every driver is prepared for. If you’re thinking about becoming an owner operator eventually, you’ll have to start preparing years in advance. When you’ve put in the work, you’ll start to feel more and more confident. Once that happens, look for these 5 signs that you’re ready to become an owner operator.

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Truck drivers, like most people, are always looking for ways to improve their health. Changing what you eat is usually a great place to start. Following a Keto way of eating has become a very popular, and effective way to lose weight and get healthier. But for truckers, life on the road can complicate things if it’s tough to access the right foods away from home. We’ve searched around popular websites looking for trucker friendly Keto recipe ideas. Here are some of the best Keto meals for truckers.

But first, have you already heard of Keto? The Ketogenic way of eating, or Keto, has been around for a very very long time. It’s had a surge in popularity recently, along with other low-carb diets like Adkins, and the Paleo diet.

In a nutshell, Keto is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein, and high fat way of eating. It eliminates eating all types of sugar and all carbs from grains (bread, pasta, crackers, etc.).

It allows only eating “good” carbs from certain vegetables and a limited amount of fruit. The aim is to eliminate creating an insulin response from your body, and instead move your metabolism to burning fat to fuel your body.

Image courtesy of thatlowcarblife.com

Quick and Simple Keto Meals for Truckers

Eggs are a great source of both protein and fat. Make a dozen or so before you leave for the week and pack them in a cooler. Then when you’re ready to eat them, just peel and add a little salt and pepper. To take it up a notch, try these easy keto deviled eggs. If made ahead and kept refrigerated, they should last you a few days. Add some avocado slices on the side and bed of fresh spinach, and you’re all set with a great Keto meal that takes just a few minutes to prepare. Or find ways to mix-up this recipe and add your own flair once you’ve got the fundamentals of a Keto deviled egg covered.

Eating Keto meals from fast food restaurants IS very possible. Think bun-less burgers or sandwiches, minus any sweet condiments, sauces, breading and fries. Burrito bowls or taco salads with meats, guacamole cheese & veggies, but without the chips, tortillas and corn-based salsas. Healthy salads with chicken, steak or shrimp added, less croutons and a no-sugar added dressing. Any of these Keto meals for truckers will keep you eating Keto and feeling satisfied.

Image courtesy of wholesomeyum.com

Beginner Basics

Once you learn the basics of what is and is not allowed for Ketogenic cooking, it’s easy to start getting creative with what you’re preparing. Using a basic meaty chili recipe can be the start for limitless chili varieties, sloppy joes, dips, and soups.

The biggest adjustments here are being sure to cut-out the usual breads, crackers and non-Keto vegetables that go into these types of meals.

Here’s a great Keto chili recipe to start your chili experiments. This easy to prepare Keto meal is great to make a big batch of before you head out and freeze individual portions for your meals during the week. Adding a fresh salad or some cheese on the side can make that microwaved meal feel just like at home.

Seafood Scampi courtesy of BigYogi Parker

Gourmet on the Go

Here’s a great Keto meal for truckers sent to us by Yogi Parker, a Keto trucker and terrific cook! He’s got a whole page full of Keto meals for truckers. You can follow his Facebook page for more great recipes.

Yogi Parker shared, “I make this on the truck, and it can be done in an electric skillet, on a camp stove or in a skillet over an outdoor grill.  The recipe does call for some extra dry vermouth or wine, so best if the recipe is cooked when you’re not going anywhere.  Scampi fits well in Keto due to its copious use of butter, and it is absolutely delicious over a steak for some surf and turf.”

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb jumbo Shrimp and 1 /4 lb of scallops
  • 2 sticks Kerrygold Butter
  • 1/2 cup extra dry vermouth
  • 1 large Lemon
  • 4 Garlic Cloves
  • 2 tablespoons of Avocado Oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon of cayenne pepper
  • Salt and Pepper
  • Parmesan cheese and flat parsley

Instructions:

  • Take two cloves of garlic and grate it on a fine greater. Add grated garlic and avocado oil to seafood, mix well. Cover and place into refrigerator to marinate for at least one hour, but preferably overnight. Crush and slice thin remaining garlic. If using stove, heat pan on medium high, if using electric skillet, set initial temp to about 350.
  • Lightly sear seafood in skillet, careful not to cook all the way, just until starting to become opaque.  Use tongs to turn the seafood, about a minute on each side. Remove seafood from heat and place in separate bowl.
  • Reduce heat to medium low, or about 200 degrees on electric skillet. Add in vermouth and deglaze pan. Add butter and garlic sauté for about a minute then add lemon juice. Add seafood back in, season with cayenne, salt, pepper to taste. Sauté for about five minutes. Serve over squash noodles, steamed cauliflower rice or a nice steak for a great surf and turf. Garnish with grated Parmesan and chopped parsley leaves.

Here Yogi’s best advice for those who struggle staying on a healthy lifestyle or tend to beat themselves up if they succumb to bit of temptation:

“Count every victory you have as a step closer to your goal.  Try to stay focused and disciplined, but if you do fall off the wagon, don’t stress too much.  Wagons are slow so you can always hustle and jump back on.”

Once you’ve checked with your doctor and have decided that eating Keto is right for you, it’s fairly easy to get started. There is a tremendous amount of resources online, via social media, and more than likely you’ve got a friend of family member who’s been doing it. Do your research and if you decide to try it, hopefully these Keto meals for truckers will help get your started.

Are you a trucker following a Keto diet? Drop your favorite recipes on our Facebook page. If you like this content be sure to sign-up for our newsletter so that you don’t miss upcoming articles like this!

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world without trucking

Imagine a world without trucking. Most truck drivers have a keen sense that if trucking were to stop, then the nation would come to a standstill. A study by the American Trucking Associations suggests that “when trucks stop, America stops”. While truck drivers are strongly aware of this, perhaps most people in the general public don’t know that our economy depends on trucks to deliver ten billion tons of almost every commodity consumed. If trucks stopped, there would be catastrophic effects on the food industry, healthcare, transportation, manufacturing, finance, and more. Here’s a look at what happens in a world without trucking.

Within 24 hours

  • Hospitals begin to run low on medical supplies.
  • Mail delivery and package services would stop.
  • Gas stations would begin to run low on fuel.
  • Manufacturing slows down, due to lack of supplies delivered on time.

 Within 72 hours

  • Gas supplies start to dwindle low within a few days, and prices would soar.
  • Food supplies in grocery stores are depleted, causing the prices to skyrocket. Consumers start to panic and hoard food.
  • Garbage starts to pile up to building-size, creating severe environmental and health consequences.
  • Banks and ATMs would run out of resources, creating a panic due to lack of access to cash.

Within 1 week

  • Sources of clean water will start to run low. Perishable food supplies almost depleted at food stores.
  • Without new fuel supply, automobiles are no longer able to travel.
  • Public safety threatened as police and fire departments unable to function properly.
  • Hospitals lack basic supplies including oxygen.

Within 3-4 weeks

  • Clean water supply dwindles completely. The only water safe for consumption is boiled water. Lack of clean water will lead to increased illnesses and public health risks.
  • Manufacturing comes to a standstill with lack of components, leaving thousands of people unemployed.
  • Air, rail, and maritime transportation will come to a halt due to lack of supplies for operation.
  • Country moves closer toward economic collapse due to shock in the system.
  • Health and public safety threatened as hospitals and law enforcement cannot function.
  • Environmental catastrophe will be imminent as trash and hazardous materials pile up.

These are just a few of the effects that halting trucking would bring. A world without trucking would soon bring the national economy to a standstill. It would also severely damage public health, safety, and the environment. This year for National Truck Driver Appreciation Week, we should all be thankful for the truckers in the industry who keep their trucks, and the country, running smoothly!

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home timeTruck drivers have a tough job. Driving thousands of miles each week can mean many nights away from home. It can add up to hundreds of nights away from their own bed each year. Though the paychecks might be great, all those nights away can take a toll on mental health and overall stress levels.

Of the mental health concerns that truck drivers experience, loneliness tops the list. Nearly a third of drivers say being alone all day and away from their family is a “significant issue affecting their mental health. – Business Insider

For truckers looking to spend more time with their family and friends, here’s 4 ways to increase your home time.

1. Run the Same Short Routes

If you look for routes that are about 200 miles each way, you can run those daily and be home every night. The more you focus on finding those jobs, and being consistent in your work, it can lead to a highly predictable and efficient schedule. You’ll most likely find cost and time savings as well. If predictability and repeating routines are your cup of tea as a trucker, this is the best type of work to maximize your home time.

2. Be Flexible

If you keep an open mind on working weekends, it could lead to more time at home over the course of a year. Consider working holidays as well. If you can convince yourself that weekends and holiday are just like any other workday, you could find yourself being rewarded for working when others won’t. There could even be some bonus money in it for you depending on your carrier.

3. Put in Your Time

Driver schedules usually get better with time. The longer you stay with a carrier, the higher priority you get when choosing routes. Newbie drivers tend to have to grind out the least desirable routes while gaining seniority. This can translate to the most miles away from home. But if you can grind it out and put in the time, you could eventually find yourself first in line for the prime routes. And the most time at home as well. Stick with it!

4. Be Okay with Less Pay

Some carriers offer great options for drivers to increase their home time. You can find opportunities where you might work 7 days on, and then have the following 7 days at home. Find jobs that are setup with these unique types of schedules. Find ways to be okay with the trade-off in pay. You’ll find that you can certainly have plenty of time at home.

Truckers are always seeking ways to improve their work-life balance. Finding ways to spend more quality home time is usually at the top of the list. We’ve given you 4 tips to help you strike that balance, and increase your time spent with family and friends. Do you have a great tip for your fellow drivers? Drop them in the comment box at the bottom of this page.

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Trucker meals are often thought of as fast food at truck stops or local diners. That hardly captures the variety of food which real truck drivers prefer. Some drivers have turned to cooking in their cabins to provide meals. Drivers may have food restrictions such as vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free food.

We’ve put together a list of five gluten-free recipes which truck drivers can quickly prepare while on the road or at home.

1. Gluten-free pancakes

gluten free recipes

Image courtesy of AllRecipes.com

Let’s start off with breakfast, although these delicious and fluffy pancakes are sure to be a hit anytime of day. The right type of gluten-free flour makes this dish simple and quick to make within about 20-30 minutes.

Top with your choice of strawberries, raspberries, or other condiments. Get the Recipe →

 

 

2. Cauliflower potato salad

gluten free recipes

Image courtesy of Simply Gluten Free

This fantastic gluten-free alternative to traditional potato salad makes for a easy and delicious lunch. The cauliflower provides similar flavor and texture to potato salad. Best part is that this can be ready in under 30 minutes.

You can chill the salad and keep it refrigerated at home before heading out on the road. Get the Recipe →

 

 

3. Sicilian spaghetti

gluten free recipes

Image courtesy of Simply Gluten Free

Gluten-free pasta is becoming a popular alternative to traditional pasta because many of the flavors in our favorite pasta dishes come from all the other ingredients.

You can try variations to this recipe by changing the vegetables and herbs used. Canned meats or fish makes it easy to prepare in under 30 minutes. Get the Recipe →

 

 

4. Salmon fillets

gluten free recipes

Image courtesy of Simply Gluten Free

Breaded fish makes for a simple, healthy, and delicious dinner.

This gluten-free panko-crust is perfect for adding some crispiness to the flaky salmon.

Add plenty of lime for acid, or change up the herbs and condiments for a different burst of flavor. Get the Recipe →

 

 

5. Gluten-free black and blue berries

gluten free recipes

Image courtesy of Food Network

Just because you’re trying to eat healthy doesn’t mean you shouldn’t indulge in the occasional dessert. These berries will leave your sweet tooth satisfied, while you still get a healthy dose of fruit for the day.

While most desserts can be a pain to make over hours in the kitchen, this easy dish is ready in under 20 minutes. Get the Recipe →

 

 

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