store and haul

The Drive My Way job of the day comes from Store & Haul

Store & Haul is a family owned and operated trucking company handling food grade transportation. They take pride in treating their employees like family, providing them with a stable work environment. Also, they provide modern equipment that is well maintained and assigned to each full time driver. In addition, they pay weekly and provide holiday/vacation pay and great benefits!

Currently, Store & Haul is hiring Regional Tanker Drivers in Bellevue, OH and Regional Tanker Drivers in Sidney, OH.

What Store & Haul has to offer:

  • Great medical, dental and vision insurance
  • Detention pay
  • 401(k) with company match
  • Company paid $100,000 life insurance
  • Holiday pay
  • Referral bonus
  • Vacation starts accruing on your first day
  • Dedicated runs
  • Weekly pay ranging from $1,200 – $2,500 depending on your availability

In addition, Store & Haul requires candidates to have at least 2 years of professional driving experience. Also, they ask applicants have a CDL A with a non-Hazmat tanker endorsement.

Interested in applying?

Learn more about the job requirements, benefits, pay and more.

Bellevue, OH Sidney, OH

great truck driver

Whether you’ve recently begun your CDL trucking journey, or you’ve been driving for 20 years, you probably have the goal of being a great truck driver. Truckers enjoy the freedom and independence that the road brings, and along with it the opportunity to really succeed at the job and strive for improvement. Drivers know that nothing beats the pride and dignity that comes from a job well done, and the knowledge that you’re doing honest work to provide for themselves and their families. Whether you’re a rookie driver or a veteran, there’s always room for improvement. Here are five secrets to becoming a great truck driver.

1. Safety

Veteran drivers all keep coming back to this point: safety is a driver’s number one priority.

Truck driving can be a dangerous job considering freight and road safety. Drivers are responsible for maintaining the safety of their freight, themselves, and other motorists on the road. Remember that other drivers may not be familiar with the challenges and differences in driving a truck, so you may have to go out of your way to ensure their safety as well. Safety also involves having a good mechanical aptitude in case you need to troubleshoot equipment issues while on the road.

Truly great drivers take their safety department’s concerns seriously and do the due diligence to maintain safety. Pre and post trip inspections form the backbone of safety, but it can and should go much beyond that. Maintaining a safe and accident-free record will also clear the path for continued professional success with that carrier. If you’re hoping to switch to another carrier or become an owner-operator one day, a strong safety record will be essential.

2. Build relationships

Truck driving is often considered to be a solo gig- it’s just you and the open road. But drivers are actually in constant communication with others, whether it is dispatchers, fleet managers, or other drivers. You’ll also interact with shippers and receivers, and other reps from your own carrier or others.

The secret is that you need all these people in your corner to be successful.

So, a truly great truck driver seeks to build relationships with all these colleagues.

No man is an island, and no one does it alone, so seek to build a network of people you can communicate and work well with. Always strive to be courteous and respectful to everyone and try to be easy to work with. While trucking can be challenging, avoid projecting your negativity on colleagues since it may come back to bite you. In addition, great drivers need to avoid negativity from others impacting them, since the job is too important to be affected by someone’s bad attitude.

3. Prioritize health

Great drivers are the ones who don’t let the challenges of the job negatively impact their health and lifestyle. It’s no secret that truck driving is considered an unhealthy profession. Between the schedule challenges and sitting behind the wheel for hours at a time, it can take a toll on the mind and body.

Great truck drivers know that these aren’t excuses to neglect their mental and physical health.

Truck drivers can take simple measures to improve their diet and find time to exercise regularly. Some drivers cook in their cabins, or find small snacks to continually munch on, instead of relying on the greasy truck stop food. Similarly, finding about 15 minutes to exercise everyday can make a big difference in a truck driver’s lifestyle. Not having access to a gym shouldn’t be a problem since many exercises can be done in or around your truck, or in parking lots. While a trucker’s schedule is rarely regular, making sure you get proper sleep will help keep you alert and allow the body to rest and mind to feel fresh. Great truck drivers are the ones who are happier because they found a way to prioritize health despite the obstacles.

4. Professional attitude

The difference between a good truck driver and a great truck driver probably boils down just to attitude. Companies are looking to hire drivers who have certain characteristics. They want to make sure drivers can be reliable, responsible, honest, and work hard.

However good a driver’s record, credentials, or skills are, there’s no substitute for good character.

Keeping this in mind, make sure you’re always on time. Being reliable shows everyone that you take the scheduling seriously and can be depended on to make deliveries on time. Timeliness will also shine through when you’re looking to get promotions or raises or looking for a better driving job elsewhere.

A professional attitude also means not complaining too much, or at least too loudly and to the wrong people. While trucking can be frustrating, complaining to your colleagues only reflects poorly on yourself instead of anyone else. Find a different outlet for complaining about work and maintain a professional attitude to distinguish yourself from other drivers. Working hard means sometimes taking the appealing runs or working extra when no one else can. Yes, it’s a sacrifice and you can’t do it every time. But whenever you do take that extra step, it will be noticed and will probably help in the future. Truck driving has become a more professional job, whether the general public realizes it or not. Treat yourself with respect and dignity, and maintain a professional attitude through all the troubles, and others will probably do the same.

5. Don’t forget life outside of trucking

Here’s a big secret to becoming a great truck driver: don’t think of trucking all the time.

Work-life balance is important in any profession, and it’s no different for truck drivers. In fact, there’s more of a risk that trucking can become all-consuming, so it’s important to know when to hit the metaphorical brakes and rest. Great truck drivers make sure that they find enough time to spend with their families. Even while away from home, you can Skype with the kids or enjoy a virtual date night with your partner. Finding a job with good home time will allow you to take a break from trucking, refuel and energize, and then return.

Even while on the road, great truckers will find hobbies to engage in. Some truckers like photography or cooking. Others have gotten into reading or audiobooks. Some others are passionate about travel or exercise.

Whatever your passion is, don’t leave it by the wayside just because you’re a truck driver.

Engaging in hobbies and leisure will help ensure a sound body and mind for work-life balance. Not only will you reset and forget the stresses of the job, but you’ll be better prepared for them when you get back to work. Remember: trucking isn’t everything!

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Today’s Job of the Day comes from Byland Transportation

Byland Transportation is your trusted freight carrier led by a reliable team of transportation professionals with more than 25 years experience combined. In addition, Byland values reliability, consistency, and safety.

Currently, Byland Transportation seeks OTR Company Drivers for Dry Van Freights in Markham, IL. Also, Byland provides new equipment, dedicated lanes, generous compensation and home time, and respectful managers.

Company Driver Benefit Highlights

  • W2 or 1099 option
  • Medical benefits after 90 days
  • Pay up to .58 cents per mile. All miles paid and pay is weekly via direct deposit
  • No Touch Freight with new Freightliner Trucks (2018 & 2019 models)
  • Referral Bonuses

Overall, Byland asks that applicants have a minimum 2 years of recent and verifiable driving experience with a clean background. In addition, applicants must have their CDL A license, at least 23 years old, and able to pass a drug test.

Interested in applying?

Learn more about the job requirements, benefits, pay and more.

Learn More & Apply

If you’re thinking about starting a new career in trucking, then you’ve probably been learning about how to enroll in CDL classes. The Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) is what the Department of Transportation requires all drivers to obtain before being able to drive trucks professionally. Programs which offer CDL classes include community colleges and technical schools. CDL training usually lasts several weeks and includes behind-the-wheel training and classroom preparation. Eventually, truck drivers will take a series of written exams and skills tests to be officially granted a CDL permit. The permit is the first step to finding your first driving job with a trucking carrier. Here’s everything you need to know before taking CDL classes.

What is the CDL?

Students who want to become professional truck drivers must earn a Class A CDL. There are many other classes of the CDL which we detail further below. The type of CDL you obtain will determine what kinds of trucks you’re permitted to drive. The first step is to make sure you qualify. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration sets the minimum standards that states must follow regarding the CDL, but it is the responsibility of the state to administer the license itself. Thus, some of the requirements vary some state to state. Each state is in charge of the application process, license fee, renewal procedures, and renewal cycle.

Requirements

There are some universal requirements in order to qualify for the CDL. Applicants must be 18 years old and must have a valid driver’s license from the state where they are training. They must also submit driving records from the past 3-5 years. Different states may have slightly different physical requirements to evaluate medical fitness before applicants can qualify for the CDL.

Most CDL programs or trucking carriers want a clean three-year motor vehicle record

This means no speeding tickets, DUIs, accidents, or suspensions in that time. Some companies will be more lenient than others and may encourage you to reapply in the future. Applicants must also pass a drug screening, physical examination, and background check.

Training

CDL classes will provide a mix of classroom studies and hands-on driving training. Students are expected to gain familiarity with the machinery and concepts on the road. Driving topics and techniques that are covered include close quarters driving, city driving, highway driving, road signs and rules, turning and backing-up the truck, and others. Classes will also cover a range of other helpful topics such as trucking industry information, safety and first aid, materials and cargo, state and federal laws, trip planning and routing, managing logbooks, and more. Coupling and uncoupling a trailer is another unique skill you might learn in most programs. Finally, understanding pre- and post-trip inspections is another essential skill you’ll learn.

CDL Classes

There isn’t just one CDL. There are three CDL classes which are required to operate different types of motor vehicles. This will determine what kinds of trucking jobs you can take. The three CDL classes are:

  • Class A: required for any combination of vehicles with a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) of 26,001 pounds or more, provided that the GVWR of the towed vehicle is in excess of 10,000 pounds. Vehicles requiring a Class A license are primarily tractor-trailers for long-distances.
  • Class B: required for any single vehicle with a Gross Vehicle Weight Rating of 26,000 pounds or more, or any such vehicle towing a vehicle with a GVWR that does not exceed 10,000 pounds. Vehicles requiring a Class B CDL license may include buses, dump trucks, tow trucks, delivery trucks and garbage trucks.
  • Class C: Any vehicle or combination of vehicles that does not meet the criteria of either Class A or Class B, but is designed to transport 16 or more passengers, or is used in transporting materials classified as hazardous in the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act

In addition to the license, a CDL holder can complete and pass additional testing to receive certain endorsements. These prepare you for specialized trucking jobs. You can gain them along with your CDL or add them later along the way. The endorsements include:

  • T: Double/Triple Trailers- requires knowledge test only
  • P: Passenger- requires knowledge and skills tests
  • N: Tank vehicle- requires knowledge test only
  • H: Hazardous materials- requires knowledge test only
  • X: Combination of tank vehicle and hazardous materials endorsements- requires knowledge test only
  • S: School Bus- requires knowledge and skills tests

Finding a good CDL program

In order to complete CDL classes, you need to find a solid program. You’ll need to consider the quality of training and the cost and practicality of the program before you apply. Most CDL classes are offered by dedicated truck driving schools or community colleges. Some carriers may offer to help you obtain your CDL in return for committing to working there for a period afterwards.

Make sure to consider all your options before deciding on which type of program is best for you

Location and cost are definitely factors- ideally you want to find classes close to you, but if there is a better program further away, it may be a better choice. The cost of a good program is considerable- you can expect to pay between $4,000 to $10,000 for CDL training. There are plenty of grants and other financial aid options available since there is a shortage of drivers, so be sure to do your research before dropping a pretty penny.

The quality of training is the most important thing to consider. Remember that a good program length is several weeks, or about 160-200 hours of training.

If you find programs offering a CDL within a week or two, it’s probably too good to be true

You also want to make sure you get enough behind-the-wheel time in your CDL classes, although observational time is beneficial also. The student to instructor ratio and the quality of the instructors are strong indicators of the quality of the program. Good instructors are usually former/current drivers or industry specialists. Many programs will have some sort of job placement or networking service which can help you land that first truck driving job. You can read more about how to choose a CDL driving school on our previous post about the topic.

Taking the tests

Once you’ve completed your training in CDL classes, it’s time to proceed to the exams. You’ll get the Class A CDL by passing a series of written exams, which differ by state. In most states, these include tests on General Knowledge, Air Brakes, and Combination vehicles. In addition, you must pass a CDL driving test. Usually this is a three-part exam which includes a pre-trip inspection test, basic control skills test, and driving test. This skills test must take place at either a state CDL test site or an approved third-party test site in the testing state. Once the skills test has been passed, a driver can be issued an actual CDL license from that state.

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Today’s job of the day comes from Ergon Trucking Inc. Ergon is a world class, family owned liquid tank carrier. A fleet of 156 trucks, 421 tanks and 161 owner/operators logs more than 25,000,000 miles each year in service to more than 200 satisfied customers nationwide.

Currently, Ergon Trucking is hiring multiple positions across the US.

In addition, Ergon Trucking requires the following for these positions:

  1. A minimum of 1 year experience in the operation of tractor/trailer equipment.
  2. Valid CDL A with Tank and Hazmat endorsements
  3. No more than 2 moving violations in the last 36 months
  4. Must be 23 years old
  5. No drug or alcohol convictions in the last 10 years. No felonies
  6. Able to pass DOT drug test and physical. Must meet all FMCSA guidelines

The company driver jobs offer up to $90,000 per year, a great benefits package, and late model Peterbilts and Kenworths with manual transmissions.

Interested in applying?

Learn more about the job requirements, benefits, pay and more.

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Today’s job of the day comes from Stevens Trucking

Founded in 1979, Stevens Trucking has been operating in Oklahoma and the contiguous 48 states for 40 years. We operate over 1,000 trailers and over 300 tractors between our oilfield-flatbed and dry freight divisions.

stevens truckingStevens Trucking is a family-owned and operated business. When he founded Stevens Trucking, Kenney Stevens, set out to provide rapid, reliable delivery service for the oilfield industry. As the business has grown, a family member has stepped up to take on each core aspect of the business.

Currently, Stevens Trucking is hiring CDL A drivers in the following locations:

OTR Dry Van Driver: MI, IL, MO, OH & OK & TX

  • Avg $1,100-$1,500 per week + bonus
  • Home weekly
  • Excellent benefits
  • No Touch Freight

On-Call Flatbed Driver: Oklahoma City, OK

  • 1-Ton and Tractor-Trailer Equipment
  • $5,000 Sign-On Bonus + weekly pay
  • On-Call schedule: Home most nights
  • Great benefits

Stevens requires 2 years of verifiable experience for those drivers looking to get straight to work, a minimum hiring age of 22 years old, an excellent driving record, and a CDL Class A certification.

Interested in applying?

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OTR Dry Van Midwest OTR Dry Van: OK & TX On-Call Flatbed

joe tex xpress

Today’s job of the day comes from Joe Tex Xpress

Joe Tex Xpress is a rapidly growing company which runs their own fleet of trucks and employs numerous owner/operators. Also, they are family owned and operated and strive to make their customers, vendors, and drivers feel like a part of their family. In addition, their site is located in Mt. Vernon, TX.

Are you are ready to make some real money in the Oilfield? If so, give them a try. Joe Tex Xpress is looking for dedicated and hardworking Company Driver and Owner Operator Class A Bulk Pneumatic Sand Haulers with a safety first attitude. They are currently running in East Texas, Louisiana, New Mexico and Oklahoma.

  • Owner Operators: Truck and trailer 80% of load or truck no trailer 70% of load. You can lease a trailer from us at the 10% difference
  • Owner Operators: average $4500 to $8,000 weekly based on 2 to 3 loads a day
  • Company Drivers: average $2,000 to $2,500 based on 2 to 3 loads a day
  • Currently running in East Texas, Louisiana, New Mexico and Oklahoma
  • In addition, Joe Tex requires the following certifications: PEC, H2S, Fit Test
  • Experienced in pulling pneumatic trailers (Frac Sand) not a must, will train
  • MUST have a blower on your truck. (we do not do sand boxes)
  • Available to be out 3 – 4 weeks
  • Must have at least 2 years Class A Tractor Trailer experience
  • Must be 25 years old
  • Must have clean MVR and Background

Interested in applying?

Learn more about the job requirements, benefits, pay and more.

Company Drivers Owner Operators

dedicated logistics partner

The Drive My Way job of the day comes from Dedicated Logistics Partner

The company began with 10 trucks in July 2017 and they now operate over 69 straight trucks, 36 tractors, and 59 trailers. This is across the DLP network that spans over 6 operating terminals and provides deliveries in 15 states nightly. Overall, they remain committed to providing the best service, exceeding their customers needs and wants, and going above and beyond for their people and safety. Their mission is simple: to provide the best service to their customers. In addition, they ship and deliver freight across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic daily meeting their goals in a safe and timely manor. 

Currently, they are hiring Local Class A CDL Drivers in Allentown, PA. They are offering a $2,000 Sign-On Bonus, pay $1000 – $1500/week, and get drivers home daily. In addition, they offer well-maintained equipment, have full benefits available for drivers after 60 days, and pay weekly via direct deposit. Also, drivers work Monday through Friday and enjoys weekends off!

Dedicated Logistics Partner requires applicants to have their CDL A, be at least 25 years old, and have a clean MVR record.

Interested in applying?

Learn more about the job requirements, benefits, pay and more.

Learn More & Apply

Nicer weather usually means that road construction season is about switch into high gear. Though driving safely is always a best practice, there are some additional things to be aware of when it comes to driving in a construction zone. A little bit of extra care and planning when trucking through construction zones will ensure that you AND the road workers make it home safely. Here are 3 work zone safety tips to focus on this time of year.

1. Always Be Alert

Expect the Unexpected. Be alert for work zone signage along the side of the road, and the overhead digital signage as well. Watch for workers or flaggers helping to direct traffic. Be prepared for the changes in speed limits and lane closures. Give yourself plenty of time to react and keep an eye out for those that aren’t reacting correctly.

Using your height advantage to see signage and changing traffic patterns ahead gives you an advantage when it comes to work zone safety.

And be sure to stay alert if you drive the same routes daily. A long-term construction project might have daily lane shifts or different road closures.

2. Exercise Defensive Driving Skills

Apply the best driver training and experience here. Quick stops from other drivers ahead often lead to rear-end collisions. Using good defensive driving practices allow truckers to avoid accidents and have plenty of time to stop safely.

In construction zones it’s recommended to use extra caution to prevent accidents that most commonly occur due to road work.

Give a little bit of extra braking room to allow for late mergers or someone reacting poorly to changes in the road.

3. Plan in Advance

An ounce of prevention applies here. Plan routes and timing according to what your GPS app or travel websites indicates are the best. Many times this will be to avoid road work if possible. These often will be a little bit longer but will keep you moving and not stuck in traffic jams due to construction work. And everyone arrives safely at the end of the day.

U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration

U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration, almost 30 percent of all work zone crashes involve large trucks.

The number of people killed in work zone crashes involving large trucks has been increasing. Over 1,000 fatalities and over 18,000 injuries have occurred during the last 5 years.

Work Zones might be temporary, and some might be multi-year projects in the same area. A one-day closure for minor repairs or lane painting and a 3-year interchange overhaul should demand the same amount of safety precautions from those using the roads. The construction team is out there working, sometimes around the clock, to keep the roads in good repair and improving for the future of all drivers. Be sure to continue to reference these work zone safety tips and “GIVE ‘EM A BRAKE” as the saying goes!

How to Protect Yourself from the Sun Over the Road

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cdl driving school

If you’ve decided to become a professional truck driver, finding the right CDL driving school is crucial. Enrolling in a training program is a big investment, and you want to make sure you select the right school for you. Pick a school that will set you up for acing the CDL exam the first time. Here are four factors to consider when choosing a CDL driving school.

1. How is it licensed?

The most important thing to consider is how the training program is licensed by the state’s Department of Education or Department of Motor Vehicles. Only pick a school which is licensed by state regulators so that your credentials will be accepted by all trucking companies. A licensed CDL is the requirement all truck companies look for when hiring new drivers. In addition to being licensed, some driving schools may be certified by third-party organizations. Consider it a bonus if your driving school is aligned with one of these associations. They help ensure that the school meets their additional training standards, which may be higher than those by the state. Three of the major professional driver organizations are the Commercial Vehicle Training Association (CVTA), National Association of Publicly Funded Truck Driving Schools (NAPFTDS), and the Professional Truck Driver Institute (PTDI). Ideally, your driving school is certified by at least one of these.

Do some research into what types of licenses the driving school offers. Your license classification will depend on what kind of driving you want to do and the type of truck you want to drive.

Class A certification is the most common and popular, as it is for any combination of vehicles with a gross combination weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 pounds or more. With a Class A CDL you may be able to drive tractor trailers, truck and trailer combinations, tractor-trailer buses, tanker vehicles, flatbeds, and more. Class B is for a single vehicle with GCWR of 26.001 pounds or more, including straight trucks, most buses, box trucks, and dump trucks. Class C certification is less common and usually for small hazmat vehicles, passenger vans, and small trucks towing a trailer. In addition to the CDL, you might need special endorsements to operate special types of vehicles such as hazmat or tanker endorsement. Think about what kinds of trucks and jobs you want and match them with a CDL driving school which offers those endorsements.

2. How good is the training?

There’s no point investing time and money into a CDL driving school if the training isn’t exceptional. Fortunately, there are some indicators of good programs which you can investigate before enrolling.

One of the most important numbers is the student-to-instructor ratio. A ratio of 3 or 4 students to one instructor is ideal.

You want to be able to benefit from having a few other students in the program to learn along with. Don’t settle for anything beyond a 1-5 ratio. Do some research who the instructors are. Ideally, they are former drivers or current drivers who are teaching as a side gig. Great instructors are skilled drivers but also experts on industry trends, federal regulations, and can give you perspective of the job and lifestyle. There’s no substitute to being taught by someone who has years of hands-on experience in the industry.

Another important metric is the time behind-the-wheel (BTW) where you’re controlling a real truck and not a simulator. There’s no point enrolling in a program if you don’t get significant amount of actual drive time. The more drive time, the better. A solid program will offer at least 27 hours of BTW time for each student. Observation time is important as well- your learning can benefit from watching others drive also.

Don’t forget to consider the program length. Strong programs will be around 160-200 hours in length- that’s about 4 to 5 weeks.

You’ll see ads for schools offering a CDL in a week or two: avoid them! Learning to drive an 80,000 lb tractor-trailer takes time and can’t be rushed within two weeks. Finally, research to make sure the driving school has a high graduation rate. You can research all these things by checking online reviews, the school’s website, and talking to previous graduates and current drivers about the reputation of the driving school.

3. How practical is it?

Finding a great school won’t be any help if it is impractical to enroll. You’ll need to consider cost, location, and your schedule before investing the time and money into the program. You can expect to pay between $4,000 and $10,000 for CDL training. That’s a pretty penny, so you’ll want to make sure you’re in a strong financial position to be able to invest in the driving school. Signing with the lowest tuition can be really tempting, but make sure that the school fits all your criteria before doing that.

There are dozens of truck carriers willing to pay drivers to get their CDL and come work for them. Carriers may cover a portion of your tuition or offer tuition reimbursement after you graduate.

Look into different companies to find the details and don’t be afraid to ask around about financial aid options. There are also various federal and state funding programs, including for veterans, which can help cover the costs.

Try to be flexible about the location of the driving school. If there’s a better school 30 minutes further away, then consider driving the extra distance if you think it is worth it. Even if your preferred school is in the next state, consider if you want to live there temporarily for a few weeks while in the program. You’ll be driving and living all over the country, so this can be good practice to get in the habit. Make sure to confirm that your CDL will be transferable to your state of residency. On the other hand, you may have job or family commitments during the week and can’t take off a few weeks for driving school. In that case, look for a school that offers the training program during nights or weekends. There are many students with other commitments and schedule constraints, so schools will understand that students need flexibility in order to enroll.

4. How will it help me get the first job?

Perhaps the most important thing to consider is job placement.

Your purpose in getting CDL training is a to land a great first job to set you up for a career in trucking. Ask about the driving school’s job placement services.

Many schools will have relationships with different trucking carriers which can help you find the right job for you. Opportunities to connect with visiting recruiters from the carriers upon graduation will be a major advantage in securing the first job. You can even get ahead of the game by narrowing down which companies you’d like to work for and speaking to recruiters to ask about the driving schools you are considering. If they’ve never heard of that school, it’s a good sign you shouldn’t enroll there.

Company-sponsored training programs are an alternative to finding an independent CDL driving school. If you go the company route, you get free training and a job with the company when you graduate. However, you’ll have long training days away from home and have to agree to work for the company sponsoring your training, even if its not the best fit. Consider all your options before you decide on a company-sponsored program versus an independent driving school.

Investing your time and money to start a new career path is one of the most important decisions you’ll make. Ensuring that you receive proper training and at a licensed CDL driving school is an unavoidable part of that decision. You’ll want to find the best deal for you that provides good training, is practical, and helps you land your first job, without breaking the bank. Remember these four factors when choosing a CDL driving school.

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